Adriana Cacoveanu

Adriana Cacoveanu

ADRIANA CACOVEANU, Content Writer

Adriana is the OPTASY team's digital content creator and copywriter. Her “mission” within our team is to masterfully blend the 2 main ingredients' listed in any valuable blog post's recipe (valuable information + the reader-friendly writing), as well as to craft informative and engaging content promoting our work: study cases on Drupal.org, fresh content for various pages on our company website, e-book content etc.
 

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What Are the Cannot-Live-Without Drupal Modules that Give Developers the Most Headaches? Top 4
Which of those Drupal modules that are crucial for almost any project make you want to just... pull your hair out?  For, let's face it, with all the “improving the developer experience” initiatives in Drupal 8:   BigPipe enabled by default the Layout Builder Public Media API and so on   … there still are modules of the “can't-live-without-type” that are well-known among Drupal 8 developers for the headaches that they cause. And their drawbacks, with a negative impact on the developer experience, go from:   lack of/poor interface to a bad UI for configuration to hard-to-read-code too much boilerplate code, verbosity to a discouragingly high learning curve for just some one-time operations   Now, we've conducted our research and come up with 4 of the commonly used Drupal modules that developers have a... love/hate relationship with:   1. Paragraphs, One of the Heavily Used Drupal Modules  It's one of the “rock star” modules in Drupal 8, a dream come true for content editors, yet, there are 2 issues that affect the developer experience:   the “different paragraphs for different translations” issue the deleted (or “orphaned”) paragraphs that seem to “never” leave the database for good   Developers are dreaming of a... better translation support for the Paragraphs module. And of that day when the deleted pieces of content with paragraphs data don't remain visible in their databases.   2. Views Here's another module with its own star on Drupal modules' “hall of fame” that...  well... is still causing developers a bit of frustration: You might want to write a query yourself, to provide a custom report. In short, to go beyond the simple Views lists or joins. It's then that the module starts to show its limitations. And things to get a bit more challenging than expected.  It all depends on how “sophisticated” your solution for setting up/modifying your custom query is and on the very structure of the Drupal data. Luckily, there's hope. One of the scheduled sessions for the DrupalCon Seattle 2019 promises to tackle precisely this issue: how to create big, custom reports in Drupal without getting your MySQL to... freeze.   3. Migrate  There are plenty of Drupal developers who find this module perfectly fit for small, simple website migration projects. And yet, they would also tell you that it's not so developer friendly when it comes to migrating heavier, more complex websites. Would you agree on this or not quite? 4. Rules  Another popular Drupal module, highly appreciated for its flexibility and robustness, yet some developers still have a thing or two against it: It doesn't enable them to add their own documentation: comments, naming etc. And the list could go on since there are plenty of developers frustrated with the core or with the Commerce Drupal module... The END! What do you think of this list of Drupal modules that give developers the most headaches? Would you have added other ones, as well? What modules do you find critical for your projects, yet... far from perfect to work with? ... Read more
Adriana Cacoveanu / Mar 01'2019
Ensuring a Website Accessibility Is the Editor Responsibility, as Well: 6 Best Practices for Creating Accessible Content
For it's not just the developer's job to code it or the designer's task to design it. It's your responsibility as well, as a content editor, to... write a website's accessibility. Creating accessible content is how you can contribute, directly, to ensuring its accessibility. Since it's a shared responsibility: a website's accessibility is not just coded and designed, it's written, as well. Your own accessibility checklist, as a content editor, would include tasks like:   adding alternative texts to every non-text element of the content writing relevant, descriptive text links putting together an easily scannable headings structure writing clear copy   In one word: your self-assigned “mission” when it comes to making a website accessible for everyone is to create/further optimize every aspect of the website's content with accessibility in mind. With empathy...   But What Is Accessible Content? First of all, we should make one thing clear: “Web content that's accessible to everyone” doesn't mean just “web content that's also accessible to people with various disabilities". It also refers to content that can be easily accessed and understood by:   smartphone users elderly users with no broadband users with low literacy users with English as their second language   Now, a website's content is accessible if it follows the WCAG 2.0 standards from the W3C. Or the POUR checklist if you wish:   perceivable: content should be presented so that the website users can perceive it effortlessly and instantly operable: the way it's structured should be easily operable understandable: a content's understandable once it's simple and concise and its structural elements meaningful  robust: content should be easily scanned through and correctly interpreted by assistive technologies   #1 Tip: Add Alternative Text to Non-Text Content Elements Here's a quick empathy test for you: Imagine that you're a visually impaired user. You access a website displaying lots of visually-striking imagery that you cannot or can hardly see.  Or maybe there's a button there, on the homepage, that you need to click in order to listen to a podcast, but you just can't spot it. See my point? Creating accessible content means adding alternative text to every non-text content element — image, design element, chart/table, button — on the website. Screen readers can read text only: they cannot interpret images for their assisted users...   A few best practices for using ALT text:   keep your text under 125 characters there's no need to start your alternative text with “image for...” when possible, restrain yourself from using images with text (e.g. diagrams or graphs)   # 2 Tip: Write Clear Copy For clear copy is... accessible copy. Keep your writing simple, your core ideas clear and always use plain language. This way, you'll make the message on the website accessible to everyone:   visitors with cognitive disabilities non-native English speakers users accessing the website from their mobile devices   Best practices for writing clear copy:   use active voice put the key ideas up front always “bet on” short sentences stay away from jargon avoid idioms   # 3 Tip: Writing Accessible Headings Means Creating Accessible Content  Writing for accessibility means, among other things: Structuring and styling your content so it's scannable. And relevant, properly formatted headlines will allow assistive technologies (and their assisted users, implicitly) to scan through your content, jumping from heading to heading. This way, they can easily find what they're particularly interested in, instead of forcing them to go through the entire chunk of content.   A few best practices for writing accessible headings:   go for clear and relevant headlines rather than “cute” or “smart” ones don't just bold your headlines, but use the proper hierarchy (H1, H2, H3...) and formatting —  <h> tag — instead   Note: if you overlook to format your headlines using the <h> tag, the assistive technologies won't recognize them as... headlines.   # 4 Tip: Accompany Links with Good, Descriptive Link Texts And creating accessible content does mean tackling "the links issue”: Whenever you're creating a link, make sure to add a descriptive link text, too. This way, it will be crystal clear, to all users, what kind of page that link would take them to, once/if clicked...   Some best practices for writing link texts:   make sure to signal if the link leads to a download; just insert the word “Download” in the link text or “PDF” in parentheses or “new window” keep it concise, so that the screen reader can read it fast enough avoid using “ALL CAPS” in your link text, they're harder to read avoid relying on color, only, to indicate linked text, as that's not at all writing for accessibility if you consider the color blind visitors on the website   #5 Tip: Use The Right HTML Tags to Create Bulleted Lists Can't have a clean, scannable text without some bulleted or numbered lists strategically “sprinkled” here and there, right? Just remember to format them properly:   use the <ul>  tag for bulleted lists … and the <ol> tag for numbered lists   # 6 Tip: Add Captions & Transcripts to Your Audio/Video Content Now, just try to step into the shoes of a non-native English speaker, of a hard of hearing/deaf visitor or of a user unfamiliar with the speaker's accent. How accurately would you be able to understand a video or audio piece of content? Creating accessible content means, also, adding text versions — captions — to the videos and the audio content displayed on the website.    Best practices for creating captions:   write your own captions, don't rely on automated ones (or rely on a service that transcribes the audio content for you, like Rev) make sure your captions are synchronized … exhaustive: remember to caption sound effects and background music/noise, as well and equivalent: avoid paraphrasing   Note: also, keep in mind to add a static transcript, too, useful for any user who won't/can't access your video or audio content and depends on the equivalent text   Wrap Up: Make Accessibility Part of Your Content Creation Process Making your content (more) accessible should be an integral part of your editorial workflow, not a last-minute checklist to handle. Therefore, grow a habit of:   adding alt text while you're editing your copy adding a caption as you're editing that new video that you're about to upload structuring and formatting your headings as you're working on your new blog post and so on...   In short: adopt an accessibility-first approach to your content! ... Read more
Adriana Cacoveanu / Feb 20'2019
How Do I Optimize My Website for Voice Search in 2019? 4 Web Design and Content Planning Tips
Is your website adapted to... lure in and greet voice searchers? It should, considering that there are a ton of stats showing that by 2020 30% of online searches won't even... involve a screen anymore. Voice searches are (already) taking over text-based searches. So, the question “haunting” you right now must be: “How do I optimize my website for voice search in 2019?" For, what grew as a mega-trend in 2018 — no less than 1 billion voice searches performed in January alone — will turn into reality this year. And there's no surprise here. It's just... convenience at its best:   no hands, not even a screen are required spoken language over a lot more formal, rigid written language   Now, getting back to your legitimate concern — how to get your website voice search-friendly — here are the web design and content creation/planning best practices for voice search optimization. The 2019 guide version...   1. Put the Most Sought After Information at the Very Top OK, here's the situation: User “X” has opted to use his/her search voice gadget or voice assistant to make an online query. This can only mean 2 things:   that he/she wants to skip all the steps that a text-based search would require — all that clicking and scrolling — and take the shortest path to find the needed information that he/she looks for a specific piece of information or wants to perform a specific action   And I don't mean just making a call. For instance, here's the next most sought after information or “want to perform" actions where users would use voice search instead of text:   to make an appointment to get information about any current sales, promotions and special offers (e.g. free shipping offers) to find out what are the opening hours of a given brick-and-mortar store... to get information about upcoming events   How do you prepare your website for voice search from this standpoint?  You put the most commonly sought after information in the header! So potential customers can... “grab” it as soon as they've uttered their voice queries. For instance, you could display snippets of information in the navigation bar...   2. Use Conversational Phrases and Long Tail Voice-Oriented Keywords “How do I optimize my website for voice search in 2019?” A short answer would be: By “sprinkling” conversational, long-tail keywords on your web content. By focusing your SEO efforts on phrases, even whole sentences. For, let's face it: The spoken language is clearly different from the written language. Voice queries have nothing to do with the “stiff”, standard keywords that we'd use for performing a text-based search.  In this respect, use voice-oriented keywords and phrases/sentences in your featured snippets, in your metadata... 3. “How to Optimize My Website for Voice Search in 2019?” Localize Content In other words: optimize for local voice search. And it's no “mystery” here: 46% of voice searchers look for information on businesses in their geographic area. Just put yourself in their shoes: It's far more likely that you utter “Where can I eat the best pasta in New York” compared to “Where can I eat the... in USA?” So, make sure you localize the content on your website. Meaning that you:   use verbiage and colors that resonate with those locals use visuals specific to that region include the name of that city/region (don't forget about your metadata) tag your images and video content with the name of that city/region put together location-specific pages on your website   In short, local voice search optimization is made of all those efforts geared at helping your website rank high in the voice search results. Where the voice searches are based on “... near me” or “... in [name of location]” type of queries. A piece of advice: optimizing your website for local voice search also means keeping critical information about your business —  opening hours, location, updated contact number(s) — up to date and most visible in your profile. Also, do consider creating content around business profile-relevant keywords, like “best Italian restaurant” or more specific ones: “the best carbonara pasta”.    4. Anticipate The Most Frequently Asked Questions and Create Content Around Them Another top answer to your “How to optimize my website for voice search in 2019” type of question would be: Creating content answering those specific voice queries that your potential customers are most likely to perform. And how do you anticipate those most frequently asked questions?  You rely on powerful tools like Answer the Public and, if your website's old enough, you dive into your Google Analytics data. There, under Acquisition > Search Console > Queries you'll find plenty of valuable information to explore and “exploit”. Once you know what the most common queries are, start creating your targeted content:   write quality blog posts around the answers to those “popular” questions  remember to insert those highly relevant long-tail keywords in your metadata put together a detailed FAQ page on your website place the answers to those frequently asked questions in featured boxes; this way, they'll just “stand out”, so users won't need to scan your entire website to get them … also, once/if marked properly, users don't even need to access your website: the featured snippet, including the answers to their queries, will already show up in the voice search results   Final Word  “How do I optimize my website for voice search in 2019?” By adapting the navigation & search on your website to this new reality: users... using their voices to search online. And that doesn't mean getting your website to “talk back” to its visitors. There are voice assistants and conversational UIs for that. Instead, focus your efforts on: Localizing and, overall, creating voice-search friendly content that should provide quick, accurate, specific answers to users' anticipated voice queries. ... Read more
Adriana Cacoveanu / Feb 15'2019
How to Send Richly Formatted HTML Emails in Drupal 8: Deliver the Experiences that Your Customers Expect in 2019
API first, responsive Bartik, headless and decoupled Drupal, Layout Builder, React admin UI... Drupal's evolved tremendously over these 18 years! Yet: the emails that we send out via its otherwise robust email sending system aren't different from those we used to send a... decade ago. And customers expect rich experiences outside your Drupal website or app. While website administrators expect to be enabled to easily manage, via the admin UI, their email content templates. So: how do you send HTML emails in Drupal 8? Without relying on external services, of course... And who could blame customers for expecting 2019-specific user experiences? Experiences that HTML-enabled emails deliver through their great features. Features that support Drupal editors' marketing efforts, as well:   traffic-driving hyperlinks; you get to link to your landing page right from the email visually attractive custom design; emails that look just like some... microsites all sorts of design details that reinforce your brand: buttons over cryptic links, responsive design, templated footers and headers web fonts QR codes  hierarchical display of content, that enhances readability and draws attention to key pieces of content and links in your email images and attachments tracking for monitoring opens   And speaking of admin and/or editors, the questions they ask themselves are: “How can I easily theme the emails to be sent out?” “How can I change their content templates right from the admin UI?” And these are the questions that I'll be answering to in this post. Here are your current options at hand — 3 useful Drupal 8 modules — for easily crafting and sending out HTML emails that appeal and engage.   1. The HTML Mail Module  It does exactly what you'd expect: It enables you to configure HTML emails from Drupal 8. It's the Drupal 7 go-to option whenever you want to go from plain text emails to HTML-formatted ones. A module available for Drupal 8 in alpha version. Furthermore, it integrates superbly with the Echo and the Mail MIME modules.   2. The Swift Mailer Module, The Best Way to Send HTML Emails in Drupal 8 Swift Mailer is the highly recommended method for configuring Drupal 8 to send out visually-arresting, HTML emails. Since you can't (yet) send them right out of the box with Drupal... The module stands out as the best option at hand with some heavy-weighing features:   it supports file attachments it supports inline images, as well it enables admins to send HTML (MIME) emails … to send them out via an SMTP server, the PHP-provided mail sending functionality or via a locally installed MTA agent   Note: you even get to use this module in tandem with Commerce to send out your HTML-enabled emails. There's even an initiative underway for replacing Drupal's deprecated core mail system with the Swift Mailer library. And now, here are the major configuration steps to take to... unleash and explore this module's capabilities:   first, set up the Swift Mailer message (/admin/config/swiftmailer/messages) settings to use HTML next, configure the Swift Mailer transport settings (/admin/config/swiftmailer/transport) to your transport method of choice  and finally, configure the core mail system settings to use this module for the formatter and the sender plugins   And if you're not yet 100% convinced that the Swift Mailer module is significantly superior to Drupal's default mail system, here are some more arguments:   it enables you to send... mixed emails: both plain text and HTML-enabled it provides HTML content types it supports various transport methods: Sendmail, PHP, SMTP (the current mail system supports but one method) it enables you to integrate key services with Drupal —  like Mandrill, SendGrid —  right out of the box it incorporates a pluggable system, allowing you to further extend its functionality   How about now? Are these strong enough arguments that Swit Mailer's the way to send HTML emails in Drupal 8?   3. The PHPMailer Module Another option for configuring Drupal 8 to send out HTML emails is the PHPMailer module. How does it perform compared to Swift Mailer?   It's not pluggable it's not as easily customizable as Swift Mailer  it's already embedded in the SMTP module (in fact, in Drupal 8 the default mail interface class is named “PHPMail” instead of DefaultMailSystem)   What features does it share with Swift Mailer?   it enables you to send out HTML-enabled emails with Drupal it enables you to add attachments to your emails it, too, enables you to send out mixed emails it, too, supports external SMTP servers   Moreover, you can extend its core functionality by integrating it with the Mime Mail component module (currently in alpha 2 version for Drupal 8).   4. The Mime Mail Component Module Briefly, just a few words about Mime Mail:   as already mentioned, it's a “component module”, that can be used for boosting other modules' functionality it enables you to send out HTML emails with Drupal: your mail would then incorporate a mime-encoded HTML message body it enables you to set up custom email templates: just go to your mimemail/theme directory, copy the mimemail-message.tpl.php file and paste it into your default theme's folder; this way, your email will take over your website's design style  any embedded graphics gets Mime-encoded, as well, and added as an attachment to your HTML email do some of your recipients prefer plain text over richly formatted HTML emails? Mime Mail enables you to switch your email content over to plain text to meet their specific preferences   The END! Now that you know your options, it's time to step out from the (too) long era of rudimentary, plain emails sent out with Drupal. ... and into the era of richly formatted HTML emails, that will:   enrich your customers' experiences enhance Drupal 8 site admins' experience ... Read more
Adriana Cacoveanu / Feb 06'2019
And The Award for the 2019 Canada Leader Goes to... OPTASY! In 3 Different Categories
We still can't get over this news: there are 4500 top performing companies in Canada featured on Clutch and OPTASY's a leader in 3 categories!   Top Drupal Development Companies in Canada Canada: Top Web Developers Best PHP Developers in Canada    Our clients have spoken and the Clutch team has listened to them. Then, based on the collected client reviews, they've propelled us on the 4th, respectively the 5th position of 3 most competitive categories on their annual list. To be “neighboring”, in the Leaders Matrix, all those top web development companies in Canada and to owe this honor to our clients is highly rewarding for us:   “From day 1, the communication has been the hallmark and has been phenomenal.”  “They stepped up in terms of commitment.”  “I appreciate how detail-oriented they are. That's not a strength everyone has“ (Some of our clients' reviews on Clutch)   From Just Another Drupal Development Company to... a 2019 Canada Leader  Our ascension from a small Drupal agency in early 2000 to one of the leading companies on Clutch in 2019 has been paved with hard work. And plenty of challenges, too. Looking back now, we count +10 years of determined effort to constantly diversify our services:   from Drupal site building to developing custom Drupal modules to fit each project's specific feature needs to multiple APIs (and mostly e-commerce) integrations to providing ongoing Drupal maintenance and support to redesigning and architectural restructuring  to providing back-end development support for web projects using other technologies than Drupal (Magento, WordPress, Laravel...), as well       to mobile app development with a particular focus on next-generation technologies (AI, VR, AR)   Our Strive for Excellence Is Equaled Only By Our Effort to Build Strong Client Relationships We're only as good as our clients say we are. It might sound like such a cliche and yet it's true: our recognition as a Canada Clutch leader for 2019 is the best proof.  For it's what our clients had to say about our ability:   to deliver value (expertise turned into measurable results) on time and within budget to communicate with them throughout the projects to adapt our in-depth knowledge of Drupal and experience in web development to their specific needs and requirements to “go above and beyond” (as the Clutch team itself defined our work) for meeting their projects' functionality needs    … that propelled us in top 5 PHP, web and Drupal development teams in Canada.  We cannot but make our bow to YOU, our client. And to the Clutch team, as well, for all the work invested in:   analyzing our portfolio assessing our market presence   … and for all the resources invested in interviewing our clients and promoting excellence. For challenging B2B companies to deliver stellar services.     Now, what better proof that we've already taken their challenge to excellence seriously than to be listed in one of Clutch's Leaders Matrix as a leader. In 3 categories... Thank you! ... Read more
Adriana Cacoveanu / Jan 29'2019
The Drupal Quality Initiative: How Do You Know When Your Contributed Project Is Ready to Be Released? How Do You Assess Its Quality?
Let's say you've been working on this contributed project for a few months now. It has gone from Beta 1 to Beta 2 to Beta... Now, how long till its final release? How do you know when it's ready for the Drupal community to see and use? And this is precisely why the Drupal quality initiative was launched in the first place. So that can we finally have some sort of a checklist at hand to use whenever we need to assess our code's level of quality:   the standards that we should evaluate our contributed projects by  the specific elements that go into the quality of our projects, such as contributed Drupal modules a certain hierarchy of quality that we could rate our own projects by   And so on... For, let's admit it now: Except for our own personal methodologies for self-assessment, there's no standardized benchmark that could help us evaluate our contributed Drupal projects. There's no way of knowing for sure when our projects are 100% ready to go from beta to... full release. Now, here are the legitimate questions that this initiative brings forward, along with some of the suggested paths to take:   1. What Drupal-Specific Quality Metrics Should We Use to Evaluate Our Code? How do you know when your contributed project is efficient enough to... be used by other members of the Drupal community? You need some sort of criteria for measuring its level of quality, right?    2. The Drupal Quality Initiative: A Checklist for Project Quality Assessment And this is how the “Big Checklist” for Drupal modules has been put together. One outlining all those areas of a contributed Drupal project that you should carefully evaluate when assessing its quality. Areas such as:   team management documentation testing code design requirements DevOps   All those factors and Drupal-specific elements that go into the quality of a contributed project. 3. Introducing the Idea of a Multi-Leveled Quality Hierarchy What if we had multiple levels of quality to rate our Drupal projects? Imagine some sort of hierarchy of quality that would challenge us to keep improving the way we write code for Drupal. To keep growing as teams working with Drupal. Your project might be rated “level 1”, from a quality standpoint, on its first release. But it would still stand stand the chance to get a higher score for if you strove to meet all the other criteria on the checklist. 4. You'll Be Particularly Interested in The Drupal Quality Initiative If You're A...   Site builder, scanning through the pile of contributed Drupal modules in search of the ones that perfectly suit your project's specific needs Drupal contributor in need of some sort of checklist that would include all those standards of quality and best practices to help you assess your own code's value   5. What About Non-Drupal Software Projects? How Is Their Quality Assessed? In other words: how do other communities assess their projects' levels of quality? What metrics do they use? And here, the Drupal quality initiative's... initiator gives the “The Capability Maturity Level”, set up by the Software Engineering Institute, as an example. The process model highlights 5 levels of “maturity” that a project can reach throughout its different development phases.They range from:   the“initial chaos” to planning and collecting project requirements … all the way to continuous process improvement   Now, just imagine a similar multi-level evolutionary benchmark that we could use to assess our own Drupal projects' levels of... maturity.   6. A Few Quality Indicators and Suggested Tools And the whole Drupal Quality Initiative comes down to identifying the key endpoints for assessing a project's quality, right? Here are just some of the suggested questions to use during this evaluation process:   Is it easy to use? Does it perform the intended functions? Is it efficient enough? How many detected bugs are there per 1000 lines of code How secure is it?   Now, for giving the most accurate answers to these quality assessing questions, you'll need the right toolbox, right? All those powerful tools to help you:   check whether your code is spell checked monitor the status of specific operations check whether all strings use translation see whether your code has been properly formatted   The END! And this is just a brief overview of the Drupal Quality Initiative. What do you think now, does the suggested checklist stand the chance to turn into a standardized Drupal benchmark for assessing quality? How do you currently determine your contributed projects' value? ... Read more
Adriana Cacoveanu / Jan 25'2019
How Do You Deal with Duplicate Content in Drupal? 4 Modules to Get this Issue Fixed
Accidentally creating duplicate content in Drupal is like... a cold:  Catching it is as easy as falling off a log. All it takes is to:   further submit your valuable content on other websites, as well, and thus challenging Google with 2 or more identical pieces of content move your website from HTTP to HTTPs, but skip some key steps in the process, so that the HTTP version of your Drupal is still there, “lurking in the dark” have printer-friendly versions of your Drupal site and thus dare Google to face another duplicate content “dilemma”   So, what are the “lifebelts” or prevention tools that Drupal “arms” you with for handling this thorny issue? Here are the 4 modules to use for boosting your site's immunity system against duplicate content. And for getting it fixed, once the harm has already been made:   1. But How Does It Crawl into Your Website? Main Sources of Duplicate Content  Let's get down to the nitty-gritty of how Drupal 8 duplicate content “infiltrates” into your website. But first, here are the 2 major categories that these sources fall into:   malicious non-malicious   The first ones include all those scenarios where spammers post content from your website without your consent. The non-malicious duplicate content can come from:   discussion forums that create both standard and stripped-down pages (for mobile devices) printer-only web page versions, as already mentioned items displayed on multiple pages of the same e-commerce site   Also, duplicate content in Drupal can be either:   identical or similar And since it comes in “many stripes and colors”, here are the 7 most common types of duplicate content:   1.1. Scraped Content Has someone copied content from your website and further published it? Do not expect Google to distinguish the copy from its source. That said, it's your job and yours only to stay diligent and protect the content on your Drupal site from scrapers.   1.2. WWW and non-WWW Versions of Your Website Are there 2 identical version of your Drupal website available? A www and a non-www one? Now, that's enough to ring Google's “duplicate content in Drupal” alarm.   1.3. Widely Syndicated Content  So, you've painstakingly put together a list of article submission sites to give your valuable content (blog post, video, article etc.) more exposure. And now what? Should you just cancel promoting it? Not at all! Widely syndicated content risks to get on Google's “Drupal 8 duplicate content” radar only if you set no guidelines for those third-party websites. That is when these publishers don't place any canonical tags in your submitted content pointing out to its original source. What happens when you overlook such a content syndication agreement? You leave it entirely to Google to track down the source. To scan through all those websites and blogs that your piece of content gets republished on. And often times it fails to tell the original from its copy.   1.4. Printed-Friendly Versions This is probably one of the sources of duplicate content in Drupal that seems most... harmless to you, right? And yet, for search engines multiple printer-friendly versions of the same content translates as: duplicate pages.   1.5. HTTP and HTTPs Pages Have you made the switch from HTTP to HTTPs? Entirely? Or are there:   backlinks from other websites still leading to the HTTP version of your website? internal links on your current HTTPs website still carrying the old protocol?   Make sure you detect all these less obvious sources of identical URLs on your Drupal website.   1.6. Appreciably Similar Content  Your site's vulnerable to this type of duplicate content “threat” particularly if it's an e-commerce one. Just think of all those too common scenarios where you display highly similar product descriptions on several different pages on your eStore.    1.7. User Session IDs  Users themselves can non-deliberately generate duplicate content on your Drupal site.  How? They might have different session IDs that generate new and new URLs. 2. 4 Modules at Hand to Identify and Fix Duplicate Content in Drupal What are the tools that Drupal puts at your disposal to detect and eliminate all duplicate content?   2.1. Redirect Module Imagine all the functionality of the former Global Redirect module (Drupal 7) “injected” into this Drupal 8 module! In fact, you can still define your Global Redirect features by just:   accessing the Redirect module's configuration page clicking on “URL redirects”    Image Source: WEBWASH.net What this SEO-friendly module does is provide you with a user-friendly interface for managing your URL path redirects:   create new redirects identify broken URL paths (you'll need to enable the “Redirect 4040” sub-module for that) set up domain level redirects (use the “Redirect Domain” sub-module) import redirects   Summing up: when it comes to handling duplicate content in Drupal, this module helps you redirect all your URLs to the new paths that you will have set up. This way, you avoid the risk of having the very same content displayed on multiple URL paths.   2.2. Taxonomy Unique Module   How about “fighting” duplicate content on your website at a vocabulary level? In this respect, this Drupal 8 module:   prevents you from saving a taxonomy term that already exists in that vocabulary is configurable for every vocabulary on your Drupal site allows you to set custom error messages that would pop up whenever a duplicate taxonomy term is detected in the same vocabulary   2.3. PathAuto Module   Just admit it now: How much do you hate the /node125 type of URL path aliases? They're anything but user-friendly. And this is precisely the role that Pathauto's been invested with: To automatically generate content friendly path aliases (e.g. /blog/my-node-title) for a whole variety of content. Let's say that you want to modify the current “path scheme” on your website with no impact on the URLs (you don't want the change to affect user's bookmarks or to “intrigue” the search engines). The Pathauto module will automatically redirect those URLs to the new paths using any HTTP redirect status.   2.4. Intelligent Content Tools       Personalization is key when you strive to prevent duplicate content in Drupal, right?  And this is precisely what this module here does: it helps you personalize content on your website. How? Through its 3 main functionalities delivered to you as sub-modules:   auto tagging text summarizing  detecting plagiarized content    Leveraging Natural Language Processing, this last sub-module scans content on your website and alerts you of any signs of duplicity detected. Word of caution: keep in mind that the module is not yet covered by Drupal's security advisory policy!   3. To Sum Up Setting a goal to ensure 100% unique content on your website is as realistic as... learning a new language in a week.  Instead, you should consider setting up a solid strategy ”fueled” by (at least) these 4 modules “exposed” here. One that would help you avoid specific scenarios where entire pages or clusters of pages get duplicated. Now, that's a far less utopian goal to set, don't you think? ... Read more
Adriana Cacoveanu / Jan 16'2019
10 Reasons Why AI Projects Fail or How You Can Easily Sabotage Your Own AI Project- Part 2
And I'm back, as promised, with a handful of reasons — ranging from “the usual suspects” to more nuanced ones — why AI projects fail. From:   getting too absorbed in keeping your technological assets up to date to the point of skipping to put together a solid business strategy for your AI implementation to getting overly excited about AI and trying to “force integrate” it into... everything  to skipping to further maintain it, once launched   … there are quite a few mistakes that you can easily avoid and thus foolproof your AI project. So, let me expose these hidden “traps” to you:   Mistake #6: You Put Technology Before a Solid Business Strategy AI-powered or not, it's still a... business that you're running, right? So, getting focused on technology only, turning it into the unique driver of “business” value is simply... non-realistic. First, you need to build your solid business strategy. One to include:   thorough research of your target markets all the technological assets needed to reach your AI project's goal ... along with all the resources to be invested, of course   Technology, no matter how advanced, never comes before business strategy.  That, of course, if it's business value that you try to achieve and not just... building AI for AI's sake.   Mistake #7: You Cut Down on Testing Time Probably one of the most common reasons why AI projects fail: You get all too eager (and over-confident) to release your AI-powered software out into the wild and you deliberately skip some major debugging phases. To avoid this trap, make sure to include, while setting up your business strategy, the due resources for properly testing your AI project before “setting it free”. For, placing it into the spotlight prematurely, faulted and vulnerable to future bugs, will “doom” your AI solution to years of... public distrust.   Mistake #8: You Get Stuck in a Never-Ending Development Cycle Now, mind you don't avoid a pitfall only to... fall into the next one: A never-ending design-develop-design-develop... process. For, yes, one of the worst AI mistakes is to release a buggy, poorly tested AI-enabled software product.  But it's equally risky to keep postponing its launch and get tangled up in this loop of continuously polishing it and testing it. You just risk having your competition leverage all the AI opportunities out there while you're constantly updating your software. Instead, consider launching the best possible version of your AI software. Then, collect the relevant data and the message coming from your target market to iterate and release an updated version.   Mistake #9: Baking AI into Everything- Why AI Projects Fail Trying to turn AI into an “all-purpose” tool is yet another frequent mistake behind many AI fails. I know you must be infatuated with AI (we, too, are infinitely excited with the still unexplored opportunities of artificial intelligence). Yet, do keep in mind that the right sequence is the following: You first identify the specific need/problem in the market and then come up with the suitable AI solution for it! You don't just jump on the latest AI technology and... force-fit it into any software product. For, let's face it: There are tasks where AI rocks and tasks where human staff's emotional intelligence is needed (take certain customer service scenarios, for instance). So, don't try to bake AI into... everything or your project will only swell the ranks of failed AI projects.   Mistake #10: You Skip Further Maintaining Your AI Solution A “launch and run” strategy won't propel your AI project too far ahead... That is: Just like any other product, an AI-powered software product needs periodical maintenance. Regular “infusions” of new methods, new models and training data.   The more complex it gets, the more crucial a solid maintenance strategy becomes. So, mind you do not underrate this phase. It's another too common reason why AI projects fail.   The END! These are the 10 most “popular” AI project mistakes. Which one(s) had you been more “vulnerable” to before seeing them all exposed in this post here? Photo by Rock'n Roll Monkey on Unsplash.  ... Read more
Adriana Cacoveanu / Jan 14'2019
10 Reasons Why AI Projects Fail or How You Can Easily Sabotage Your Own AI Project- Part 1
Running an AI startup? Or just planning to implement AI technology into your next software product? Then you sure don't run short on AI advice, right? Everyone's telling you why you should adopt AI, how to successfully incorporate AI into your business processes... But no one tells you why AI projects fail. What mistakes you should avoid to foolproof your AI implementation. What are those gotchas —  going from obvious pitfalls to more subtle traps —  that can easily change your AI project's results from success to major failure? It might not be as resounding as Amazon Echo's nasty blunder: The Alexa-powered device decided to throw a “surprise party”, with loud music and all that jazz, once it got a house in Berlin all for itself... Yet it would still mean flushing all your high hopes for AI and the invested resources down the drain... Now, back to the most common reasons why so many fail with AI. Or, better said: The 10 AI project mistakes to avoid.   Mistake #1: You Start Big and Spread Yourself Too Thin In other words: Don't bite off more than you can chew! I know you might be overexcited about the incredible AI potential right now. But jumping on a too complex AI project, with long time horizons, is the perfect “recipe” for failure. For, let's face it: Expecting AI to instantly transform all your business processes, to go from no value to 100% value for your AI project is as realistic as... checking off all your New Year's resolutions on the 1st of January. Instead, start small and grow big. Take your time to learn more about the technology you're implementing. To gradually gain all the needed expertise, to fail fast and organically grow your AI project. Rather than artificially pumping it up.   Mistake #2: You Keep Your R&D Expenses to a Minimum Failing to see research & development spending as an investment is one of the most common AI project mistakes. In short, getting stingy when it comes to investing in:   training programs for your employees research on advanced algorithms heavy experimentation with those cutting-edge AI technologies that you expect your team to develop computing infrastructure   … is not a way to save money. It's the shortest path to AI project failure, actually.   Mistake #3: Vague Goals, The Key Reason Why AI Projects Fail What's your vision?  What short-term goals have you set for your specific application of AI, in your... specific industry (be it health care or finance or...)?  Make sure you articulate those goals crystal clear and share them with your team. Oh, you don't have a vision? Not just yet? Only high hopes and expectations about how AI will completely transform your business? Or is it just a few ambiguous, fragmented goals and vague objectives that you have at hand? Then I'm sorry to break it to you: no clear vision means no great value that you could “reap” from your AI project.   Mistake #4: Your AI-Powered Software Doesn't Meet Any Real Need Your new AI technology needs to be usable. And that says it all: Building AI for AI's sake is as profitable as... designing bathing suits for Eskimos. Above all things, your AI project has to meet real business needs. Therefore, make sure you don't fall into the “technology bubble” trap. Do your research, identify the current needs in the finance, health care, disease research or any other field that you target and adapt your new tech accordingly. The main reason why AI projects fail? They're built to awe, not to serve. They put outstanding, revolutionary technology before real people's needs. Instead of aligning it to them.   Mistake #5: You Rely on AI Newbies Only If you ran a 5 star Michelin restaurant would you ask your cashier to cook that exquisite dish recently added to your menu?  See my point? One of the most common reasons why AI projects fail is because startups hand their projects to AI enthusiasts with great potential and zero work experience. Be better than that! Aim for AI expertise when you're recruiting for the team that will be working on your new AI project. Don't just expect AI newbies to... turn into AI experts overnight or your internal staff to jump on a totally new technology and turn your project into the... next new AI companion robot!   Enthusiasm won't compensate for all those imminent mistakes and fails to execute your AI strategy. And these are just 5 of the most common reasons behind AI fails. Stay tuned, for we have 5 more to expose to you in all their “glory” in our next post... Photo by Rock'n Roll Monkey on Unsplash.  ... Read more
Adriana Cacoveanu / Jan 11'2019