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What Are the Top 10 JavaScript Libraries in 2017 that You Should Learn?

What Are the Top 10 JavaScript Libraries in 2017 that You Should Learn?

by Adrian Ababei on Nov 24 2016
There, there, no need to get yourself stressed out over all the new Javascript libraries trying to lure you with their irresistible features. It's impossible even to test all of them!
 
Why should you allow this whole array of equally tempting choices to “sabotage” your efficiency by keeping you from creating new amazing websites and innovative web apps?
 
So, how can you keep your focus? By keeping a close eye on these 10 (lesser known) JavaScript libraries that we're convinced that will gain popularity and become the 10 most influential ones in 2017.
 
Find out what our predictions rely on!

 

1. Node.js

 
A bit sick and tired of hearing everyone in the web community keep talking about Node? No wonder it's one of their main topic:
 
  • it's one of those JS libraries that keeps on growing and growing at a mind-blowing speed, no doubt about that
  • it makes that reliable “boost”, the ideal environment, for any developer to get his web development project started with
  • it turns local packages management into a “child's play” in the command line
  • it eases your unit testing (in Mocha.js) work
  • it puts the Sails.js framework at your disposal for building your front-end interface
 

2. Riot.js

 
Now here's another JS library that will be wrapped in glory in 2017! Mostly front-end developers will get all excited around it!
 
Where will the excitement come from? Its helps you create powerful digital interface libraries!
 
But what makes it a strong alternative to React, one that you should even consider?
 
Here are just 3 answers to this legitimate question:
 
  • the whole community of developers backing up Riot.js, that you get to rely on, will make getting the answers to your questions much more time-efficient
  • its simple syntaxh makes it easier for you to control it while you're access DOM
  • it makes the perfect choice for customizing the elements of your app
 

3. Keystone.js

 
We could say that Node.js “passes on the torch” to Keystone.js.
 
Once you've used all of Node.js' capabilities in your web development process, reach out for Keystone. It will empower your website/web app with a 100% JavaScript, full-scale CMS engine!

 

4. D3.js

 
What do you currently rely on for creating eye-pleasing visualizations of your data?
 
Whatever you're using, you should definitely let D3.js stir your curiosity. 
 
It has no rival among the JavaScript visualization tools. It will help you add the modern edge to your graphs, dynamic visualizations and charts in no time.
 
Give it a try! Don't let the trends in the big data industry pass you by, be the one who crafts the trends!  

 

5. Create.js

 
On a constant look for the best toolkit to rely on when you create all your web animations and digital media “awesomeness”? 
 
Well, you should consider Create.js for the role of “assistant” in your work. It's so much more than just “another JavaScript library”: it's a whole collection of libraries in fact. Each one of these “sub-libraries” spoils you with certain features and help you target certain parts of your digital media projects, so that that you should pick the ones that specialize on what you want to achieve in 3D. 
 
For instance, one library/feature will help you build custom animations for the web, while others will help you handle the HTML5 canvas elements. Got the idea? 

 

6. Meteor.js

 
What's your future web development/web design project? And your second one? How about the third one in your schedule?
 
Well, learn that you can practically build all these platforms on Meteor! All of them, plus the ones that are still in the phase of ideas populating your imagination!
 
Being an open source project, it empowers you with unlimited freedom of creation and innovation. From chat apps, to social media platforms, from custom dashboards to social voting website you can build anything from the ground up on Meteor and React.
 
Unlimited possibilities? Who could say no to that?
 
It's true though that Meteor is for the skilled web developers, it's not one of the easiest JS libraries to learn! Therefore, expect to have your brain muscle challenged a bit before you get to play with its whole array of great features!

 

7. Vue.js

 
Are you in the Angular fans team or in the Ember addicts team?
 
Now what if I told you that a new “actor” will be stepping on the stage and stealing the spotlight: Vue.js?
 
For front-end developers it will be more than just “lucky no. 3”. It's a MVVM front-end framework and it's Javacript (how else!)! Therefore, it steps away from the standard MCV architecture.
 
Although learning it might turn out to be quite a challenge, don't let that discourage you: this is going to be the two typical front-end frameworks' (Amber and Ember) big “rival” in 2017, so you'd better be one step ahead of trends and start learning it now!

 

8. WebVR

 
How's your VR projects coming along? 
 
JavaScript comes to streamline your workflow with its' new API made for VR in your browser. 
 
It's still under testing (and being an open source you can just imagine the “army” of developers testing all its weaknesses, checking how it works on VR devices and in the latest browsers), but even so, dare and rely on our prediction: you want to keep an eye on it in 2017!

 

9. Chart.js

 
Name a type of chart that you need to integrate in your website/web app and we'll tell you that you can easily put it together with Chart.js.
 
Besides the cool data graphs that you can build, we've put this Javascript library on our list due to its other tempting features:
 
  • it's so easy to customize 

     
  • it's easy peasy to set it up, too

     
  • it comes already upgraded with great options for animations

     
  • it's an open source, meaning that you gain access to helpful documentation, too!
 

10. Three.js

 
And here's a more than useful JavaScript resource whenever you feel the urge to pull off some:
 
  • unbelievably realistic motion-sensitive backgrounds
  • mind-blowing 3D effects
  • amazing 3D web graphics
 
 
Don't you look forward to 2017 now, knowing what cool JavaScript libraries will get perfected and ready to help you enhance your full potential as a developer?
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