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Bringing Gutenberg to Drupal: A Modern Admin UI, a Better Editing Experience in Drupal 8
It's a robust, flexible and admin feature-packed CMS, there's no point in denying it. And yet: Drupal (still) lacks a modern UI that would make building rich web content —  such as landing pages — a breeze. But there is hope: the Gutenberg editor has been ported over, promising a better editing experience in Drupal 8. The team behind this daring project? Frontkom, a Norwegian digital services agency that:   refused to just sit and wait (for a year or two) for the in-progress initiative of modernizing Drupal's admin UI to grow into a core solution decided to capitalize on their experience in working with the Gutenberg page builder  … and on this content editor's open source nature, too … to bring it over to Drupal 8   Now, if you're determined to improve the editorial UX on your Drupal site, to “spoil” your editors with a modern, intuitive and flexible admin UI, keep on reading...   1. The Drupal Gutenberg Project: Aiming for a Modern Admin UI in Drupal 8 And by “modern” I do mean the opposite of the Panels & Paragraphs & Layout combo solutions currently available for editing text in Drupal. Solutions that only manage to make the entire workflow... discouragingly complex. Especially if it's rich web content that editors need to create via the Drupal admin UI. And this is precisely the context where the Drupal Gutenberg project was born: Drupal desperately needed/needs a modern, JavaScript-based admin UI. With WordPress 5 users already enjoying this fancy content editor and the Frontkom team's having gained experience in using it, the idea of porting it to Drupal started to form: "Why wouldn't we make it possible for Drupal users, too, to benefit from this content editor?"  And here are some of the original Gutenberg project's features that lead them into thinking that, once ported, the editor would significantly improve the editing experience in Drupal 8:   it's (highly) decoupled it's open-source it's React.js-based  it provides a simplified, smooth and cool functionality-packed admin UI it's Medium and Squarespace's inspired it turns the creation of complex landing pages into a breeze   Page editing in Drupal 8 wasn't going to be the same again! Their initiative turned into a Drupal 8 module —  Gutenberg Editor —  currently still an experimental one.  Curious enough? The first step to satisfy your curiosity is to take a look at their live demo: an interactive glimpse into the Gutenberg text editor implemented in Drupal 8.   2. The New Gutenberg for Drupal: Top Features Improving the Editing Experience in Drupal 8   2.1. All the Page Elements Are... Content Blocks That's right, the team behind this project capitalized on the “everything is a block” Drupal 8 concept when adapting the Gutenberg UI to Drupal. The result? Both the Drupal core blocks and 20+ Gutenberg blocks are available in the resulting admin UI. Basically, a Drupal 8 editor can insert into the web page that he/she's creating any of the core Drupal blocks and of the Gutenberg blocks of choice. Speaking of which, let me point out just a few:   Heading Image gallery Auto embedded social posts Buttons Custom Drupal blocks Layout blocks   Needless to add that you're free to enrich this list with your own custom blocks, too.   2.2. Easy Switch from Visual to Code Editor That's right, the Gutenberg UI enables you/your editors to quickly switch to code editor —  opening up a neat markup —  and to apply any needed tweaks on the output.   2.3. Positioning Content Is Straightforwardly Intuitive Editors get to select precisely where they want to position different types of content on a page. And the very same results that they generate while in the Gutenberg admin UI get instantly reflected on the live web page, as well. And there's more! More great admin features improving editing experience in Drupal. For instance: Full control over font sizes and colors; tweaking them becomes a breeze with the new editor.   2.4. There's a Blocks Search Box And not only that:   using this search box you can track down precisely those content blocks that you need to add to your page but you can access them inline, as well, using “/”.   2.5. Full Control of the Layout Another great thing about the content blocks available in the Gutenberg UI is that: they can have child blocks, too! This way, it'll get unexpectedly easy for your editors to split their used blocks into columns on a grid.   2.6. Auto Embedded Social Posts/Videos And all it takes is pasting their URL.   The Story of a Real Challenge: Making Gutenberg CMS-Agnostic Open source, but not fully CMS-agnostic...  The team behind the Drupal Gutenberg project had to come up with a suitable solution for this challenge. And they did come up with a multi-step solution to make the fancy text editor work in Drupal 8, as well:   first, they created a fork and removed the WordPress specific features they used the Gutenberg editor as a dependency  next, they set up a standalone NPM package then they built the Gutenberg Editor module   In short: a fork of the initial Gutenberg project is still maintained while being used as a dependency of the new Drupal 8 module. Therefore, each time Gutenberg gets an update, the corresponding Drupal module, too, gets a new release. Now, digging deeper into the project's architectural design, we discover 2 elements that the team had to re-write for Drupal:   the URL defining the editor routes (edit page route, new page route, preview page route) the API-request, now configured to “talk to” Drupal (instead of the WordPress API)   How does the new module work?   as a text editor, which can be easily enabled for each content type all it takes is a long text field for it to work: it replaces the node edit UI for that specific content type   Note: the Frontkom team also “promises” us to re-use many of the Drupal-specific stylings for the editor's UI elements in order to add a familiar Drupal feeling to it.   What Next? What's The Project Roadmap Ok, so what we know for sure now, regarding this ambitious initiative turned into a Drupal module is that:   the Drupal Gutenberg module is downloadable, yet still experimental (for developer use only) the team's still working on the project, implementing new features and functionalities aimed at making it feel more... Drupal native the final version will be presented to the eager/intrigued/curious/skeptical Drupal users and developers in the coming months   The END! Can't hide that I'm more than curious what you think about this contrib solution for improving the editing experience in Drupal 8:   Are you looking forward to using it, hoping that this editor would make up for the inconvenience of working with Drupal's current admin UI? Are you skeptical about the perspective of being tied up to a WordPress page builder?   ... Read more
Adriana Cacoveanu / Aug 17'2018
How to Get Gatsby to Work with Drupal: Building a Gatsby Site with a Decoupled Drupal Back-End
Just imagine: putting together the powerful UI creation tools of a static site generator — more of a modern front-end framework rather —  built for high speed, like Gatsby.js, with Drupal 8's content modeling and access system! Putting their powers together into a blazing-fast website! But how to get Gatsby to work with Drupal? How do you build a plugin that fetches data from API-first Drupal? In short: a static, conveniently simple, yet robust Gatsby site powered by a powerful, decoupled Drupal back-end? You've got the questions, we've got the answers... And we've grouped all our answers to your questions regarding “API-first and decoupled Drupal in connection with Gatsby” in a straightforward 4-step tutorial. One on building a high-speed Gatsby website backed by a versatile headless Drupal CMS. Shall we dig in?   1. But What Is Gatsby.js More Precisely? The standard, rather rigid definition would be: “It is a GraphQL-fueled, React-based static site generator.” Now if the words “static site generator” just make you... cringe, here's a more nuanced definition for you: “Gatsby's more of a modern front-end framework —  one pulling together the best parts of GraphQL, React, webpack, react-router — built with the developer experience in mind.” In short: it's a static site that this “more than just a static site generator” helps you build, leveraging its out-of-the-box front-end tools. A website geared to reach fast page loads while pulling data from a decoupled Drupal CMS. And there are 2 basic steps for getting started with Gatsby. You simply write your site's code structure and let Gatsby handle the rest:   turn it into a directory with a single HTML file … along with all your static assets 2. 3 Reasons Why You'd Want to Use Gatsby … instead of Jekyll, your webpack config or create-react-app.   a. Because of the richness of the Gatsby ecosystem With rich documentation at hand and backed by an already large community of starters, you'll get your Gatsby site up and running in no time.   b. Because it leverages GraphQL' power to build its data layer. And this is one of those heavy-weighting reasons for using Gatsby over other competing alternatives: Gatbsy's built to fetch data from... pretty much anywhere — your CMS of choice, Markdown, third-party APIs, Markdown — using “source” plugins. When creating its data layer, it relies on GraphQL, which builds an internal server of all this pulled data. In short: when questioning yourself “how to get Gatsby to work with Drupal”, do keep in mind that in your future Gatsby & decoupled Drupal setup data gets queried from the same place, in the same way, via GraphQL.   c. Because it's built for high speed. And this is one of Gatsby's hardest-to-resist-to advantage: It's just... fast. And that gets reflected in your final Gatsby & decoupled Drupal site while bubbling up to the user experience, as well. Summing up, these are the 3 strongest reasons why you would be tempted to use Gatsby with Drupal CMS.  I'm not going to engage in dynamic sites vs static sites debate now. The internet's already overcrowded with such comparisons. I'll just end this “pledge” on using Gatsby with a non-debatable statement: Since a static site generator pre-generates the pages of your website, scales of performance vs maintenance costs gets unbalanced. And guess which one's going up and which one down!   3. And Why Would Pair Gatsby with Drupal? If there are strong reasons why you should be getting started with Gatsby, why is there any need to consider decoupled Drupal CMS for its back-end? Because static site generators don't “care” much for the authoring experience. Content editors have to get themselves tangled up in Markdown for creating content. True story! And this is where powerful CMSs, such as Drupal, step in, “luring” you with their: WYSIWYG editors content types  content modeling capabilities access workflow capabilities … to make your content team's lives easier! And now your “How to get Gatsby to work with Drupal” dilemma turns into a new legitimate one: How to make your Gatsby website cope with a decoupled Drupal setup without adding the “dread” of a database and web server to the equation? 2 elements that “pave the path” for performance and security issues... Well, this is precisely what this “decoupling Drupal with Gatsby scenario means to avoid: you'll get to host your Drupal CMS in-house … and thus take full advantage of the robustness and versatility of a decoupled Drupal CMS back-end your Gatsby website will fetch data from its Drupal back-end and generate content “the static way” (which translates into “incredibility fast page loads”)   4. How to Get Gatsby to Work with Drupal More Precisely Or simply put: how to pull data/content from Drupal into your Gatsby website? Here's a straightforward tutorial in 4 steps on how to integrate Drupal with Gatsby:   4.1. First, Build Your Drupal Server  Assuming that you have a Drupal 8 website installed, the very first step to take is to:   a. Create a new content type  For this exercise, it's a blog — including all its blog posts — that we'll try to transfer from Drupal to Gatsby. So, we'll name our content type: “Blog”. It will include 3 basic fields: title body image Just navigate to Home>Administration>Structure>Content Types.   b. Turn Drupal into an API Server  And there are 2 key modules that you'll need to install:   jsonapi_extras: for gaining more control over the API (to disable resources, to change the default endpoint, to enhance field output etc.)  jsonapi, which will turn your Drupal website into an API server (one having a default endpoint)   c. Grant Anonymous User Permission to Access the JSON API resource list If you overlook this step, you'll end up with an “Error 406” message, which will just sabotage your whole “decoupling Drupal with Gatsby” mission.   d. Check How Your Drupal API Server Works  You can do this by navigating to http://[your-site]/jsonapi logged in as an Anonymous user. If the page that you'll get displays all the information regarding your API server, then you'll know you're on the right track.   4.2. Then, Create a New Gatsby Site But before you jump to building your new static website, check whether you have npm and node installed on your PC.  How? By entering “npm  -v” and “node  -v” into your terminal. Next, you'll need to install Gatsby's CLI:   npm install --global gatsby-cli Then, just build and get your Gatsby site up and running. Note: by default, it will be accessible at localhost:8000. 4.3. Decouple Drupal with Gatsby: Pulling Data from the API Server   a. Set up the (/blog) page Solving your “How to get Gatsby to work with Drupal”  type of dilemma starts with... the creation of a new page on your Gatsby website. And is as simple as... setting up a new JS file. Note: all your Gatsby pages will get stored under /src/pages. Now here are the basic steps to take:   create the blog.js in /src/pages then add this code: import React from "react" const BlogPage = () => ( <div> <h1>Latest from our bog</h1> </div> ) export default BlogPage    Voila! You've just created a new page at /blog.   b. Pull Content from the Drupal 8 site using GraphQL The “gatsby-source-drupal” plugin, to be more specific. It's this source plugin that will be “in charge” with all the data (images here included) pulling from decoupled Drupal back-end and pushing into your Gatsby site. Note: do keep in mind that, in this case, the JSON API module plays a crucial role. And here's how you install your “power” plugin:   // in your blog.gatsby folder npm install --save gatsby-source-drupal Next, just configure your newly installed plugin:   // In gatsby-config.js plugins: [ ... { resolve: 'gatsby-source-drupal', options: { baseUrl: 'https://goo.gl/Cc5Jd3 apiBase: 'jsonapi', // endpoint of Drupal server }, } ], Tada! Now your site should be functioning properly. If... not quite, here are the causes of the 2 most common error messages that you could get:   “405 error”, check whether the jsonapi_extras module is enabled “ 406 error”, have a closer look at the permission on your Drupal site   c. Configure GraphQL to Pull Specific Pieces of Content from Drupal In other words: to query all the “blog” nodes from Drupal and request specific data from the API server. Another strong reason for using Drupal CMS with Gatsby is that the latter provides an in-browser tool for testing GraphQL queries names, for writing and validating them. You can access it at localhost:[port]/___graphql, whereas in our particular case here at: localhost:8000/___graphql. Now, as you're solving this “How to get Gatsby to work with Drupal” type of puzzle, just try to query all the blog nodes. Next, navigate back to your blog.js file and run this query:   export const query = graphql` query allNodeBlog { allNodeBlog { edges { node { id title body { value format processed summary } } } } } ` Then, update your const BlogPage so that it should display the body, content, and title: const BlogPage = ({data}) => ( <div> <h1>Latest from our blog</h1> { data.allNodeBlog.edges.map(({ node }) => ( <div> <h3>{ node.title }</h3> <div dangerouslySetInnerHTML={{ __html: node.body.value }} /> </div> ))} </div> ) Next, save your file and... “jump for joy” at the sight of the result: All your blog posts, nicely displayed, pulled from Drupal and published on your Gatsby site!   4.4. Finally, Just Go Ahead and Publish Your New Gatsby Site And here you are now, ready to carry out the last task of your “How to get Gatsby to work with Drupal” kind of “mission”.  This final task is no more than a command that will get your Gatsby website running: gatsby build Next, just run through your /public folder to see the “fruits of your work”. At this point, all there's left for you to do is to copy/push content in /public to the server and... deploy your new website using Gatsby with Drupal CMS. The END! This is how you do it: how you use Gatsby.js in a decoupled Drupal setup so you can benefit both from: a modern static site generator's robustness and high performance, built with developer experience in mind  a powerful CMS's content managing capabilities, built with the editorial experience in mind  ... Read more
RADU SIMILEANU / Aug 13'2018
10 Essential Modules to Start Building Your Drupal Site from Scratch: Toolkit Must-Haves
So, you've installed your version of Drupal and you're now ready to actually start building your website. What essential tools should you keep close at hand, as a site builder? Which are those both flexible and powerful must-have modules to start building your Drupal site from scratch? The ones guaranteeing you a website that:   integrates easily with all the most popular third-party services and apps is interactive and visually-appealing, irrespective of the user's device is a safe place for users to hang on, interact with, shop on, network on... is conveniently easy for content managers and admins to handle   Luckily, there are plenty of modules, themes and plugins to overload your toolbox with: Long gone are the code-centric webmaster's “glory days”! Nowadays, as a Drupal site builder, you have a whole array of tools at your disposal to just start building and getting a Drupal site up and running in no time. Sometimes without the need to write a single line of code! But, let's not beat around the bush any longer and have a close look at these 10 essential modules that you'll need for your “Drupal 8 site building” project:   1. Password Policy Definitely a must-have module: Just consider that Drupal accepts ANY user password, be it a... one-letter password! So, in order to set up your own stricter and safer password policy, you need to install this module here. Then, you can easily define:   the minimal (and maximal) no. of characters that any user password on your Drupal site should include the no. of special characters that it has to include specific restrictions Like: "one can't use his/her email address as his/her password"   2. Comment Notify Why should this module, too, be in your essential toolkit of modules to start building your Drupal site with? Because it implements the functionality to get notified — you, the admin or content manager —  as soon as a user posts a comment on the website. Note: you can get “alerts” about both the logged in and the anonymous visitors' comments.   3. Breakpoints, One of the Must-Have Modules to Start Building Your Drupal Site  It goes without saying that one of the Drupal site building best practices is providing it with a responsive web design. And this is precisely what this module here facilitates: Setting the proper media queries, once you've defined your own breakpoints.   4. Simple Hierarchical Select             A module whose functionality bubbles up to the content manager's experience. Whenever he/she will have to make a selection involving both categories and subcategories, this hierarchical type of selection will prove to be more than useful: Practically, once you/they select the “main” option, a new drop-down menu/widget including the subcategories to select from, pops up, as well. Like in the image here below: 5. EU Cookie Compliance And complying with this EU notification is mandatory.  So, this is why EU Cookie Compliance is another one of the essential modules to start building your Drupal site with: It displays the given notification — providing visitors with the option to agree or/and to read more information about your cookie policy —  in the footer of your website.   6. Shield               Any Drupal site building guide would advise you to install a module that shields your website from anonymous users and search engines when running your test environments. And this is what Shield is built for: To screen your site from the rest of the world —  except for you and the logged in users — when you deploy it in a test environment. A more than convenient method, as compared to manually setting up a .htpasswd and then integrating it with .htaccess.   7. Beauty Tips     If you're not just another Drupal site builder, but a user experience-centric one, you must consider also those modules to build your Drupal site with that boost the level of user interactivity. Like Beauty Tips here. It displays balloon-help style tooltips whenever a user hovers over a certain text or page element on your website. Pretty much like Bootstrap tooltip does.   8. Secure Login           Another one of the Drupal site building best practices is to turn it into a safe place for your users to be.  In short: to protect their privacy. And if you're building a website that's available on both HTTP and HTTPS, the Secure Login module comes in handy as it makes sure that:   the user login form all the other fill-in forms that you'll configure for extra security   … get submitted via HTTPS. It locks them down, enforcing secure authenticated session cookies, so that user passwords and other critical user data don't get exposed all over the internet.   9. Menu Target   It's another one of those essential modules to start building your Drupal site with if you're determined to provide the best user experience there. What does it do? It enables particular visitors on your site — those granted permission to edit and to add new menu items — to choose whether they open menu items in new windows or in the current ones.   10. Persistent Login A module that makes up for the “Remember me” feature that's missing from the user login screen in Drupal: It comes to implement this missing option, one independent from the PHP session settings. So, we're not talking about the conventional, too long “PHP session time” here, but about a more secure and user-friendly “Remember me” feature added to the login form. Furthermore, the module enables you to define some extra security policies, too:   the no. of persistent sessions that a Drupal user can enjoy at the same time specific pages where users still have to log in again after how long the logged-in users will need to re-enter their credentials once again   And 2 “Extra” Modules to Consider When Building Your Drupal Site By “extra” I mean that they're not really essential modules to start building your Drupal site with. Yet, they're the first 2 ones to consider right after you've put together your “survival” toolkit as a site builder:   1. Site Settings & Labels     Take this common scenario: You need to display a social network URL on multiples pages on your Drupal site.  What do you do?   you hard coding this single setting in the source you start building a custom Drupal module for handling this variable you install the Site Settings & Labels module and thus display a checkbox to render page elements through a template conditional   The “c” variant's undoubtedly the winner here.  A win-win for you, in fact:   you save the time you'd otherwise have spent coding you improve the user experience on your Drupal site   2. Slick/Slick Views/Slick Media           It's actually a suite of modules to start building your Drupal site with. One “injecting” the needed functionality so that you can easily set up:   carousels slideshows   … on your freshly built website. Note! I won't lie to you: setting up the library dependencies is not exactly a child's play. Yet, once you've succeeded it, configuring the modules in this suite, right in your Drupal admin, is piece of cake. The END! These are the 10 must-have modules to start building your Drupal site from scratch with. Would you have added some more?  Or maybe you wouldn't have included some of the modules listed here, as you don't consider them “essential”? A penny for your thoughts! ... Read more
RADU SIMILEANU / Jul 20'2018
How to Add Autocomplete to Text Fields in Drupal 8: Defining a Custom Route
Let's say that it's a WhatsApp-like, a decoupled, Drupal 8-backed, real-time chat platform that you're building. One using Node.js. In this case, implementing field autocomplete functionality becomes a must, doesn't it? But how do you add autocomplete to text fields in Drupal 8? Needless to add that such otherwise "basic" functionality — implemented on fields like node reference and user/tags — would instantly:   improve the user experience  increase the level of user interactivity and engagement   Users would group around different "channels" and be able to easily add new members. The auto-complete text fields will make the whole “new member coopting” process conveniently easy: Users would only need to start typing and an array of name suggestions (of the already existing team members) would spring up. But let's see, specifically, what are the steps to take to implement autocomplete functionality in Drupal 8:   1. The Drupal Autocomplete Form Element: Adding Properties to the Text Field The first basic step to take is to define your form element. The one that will enable your app's users, on the front-end, to select from the suggested team members' names. For this:   navigate to “Form” (you'll find it under “Entity”) scroll the menu down to ”NewChannelForm.php”   Note: using “#autocomplete_route_name element”, when defining your form element, will let Drupal know that it should ignore it on the front-end. And now, let's go ahead and assign specific properties to your form's text field! For this:   define “#autocomplete_route_name”, so that the autocomplete JavaScript library uses the route name of callback URL define “#autocomplete_route_parameters”, so that an array of arguments gets passed to autocomplete handler   $form['name'] = array( '#type' => 'textfield', '#autocomplete_route_name' => 'my_module.autocomplete', '#autocomplete_route_parameters' => array('field_name' => 'name', 'count' => 5), ); And this is how you add #autocomplete callback to your fill-in form's text field in Drupal 8! Note: in certain cases — where you have additional data or different response in JSON —  the core-provided routes might just not be enough. Then, you'll need to write an autocomplete callback using the “my_module. autocomplete“ route and the proper arguments (“name” for the field name and “5” as count, let's say). And here's specifically how you write a custom route:   2. Add Autocomplete to Text Fields in Drupal 8: Define a Custom Route How? By simply adding the reference to the route — where data will get retrieved from — to your “my_module.routing.yml file”:   my_module.autocomplete: path: '/my-module-autocomplete/{field_name}/{count}' defaults: _controller: '\Drupal\my_module\Controller\AutocompleteController::handleAutocomplete' _format: json requirements: _access: 'TRUE' Note: remember to use the same names in the curly braces (those that you inserted when you defined your “autocomplete_route_parameters”) when you pass parameters to the controller!   3. Add Controller with Custom Query Parameters In the custom route that you will have defined, you'll have a custom controller AutocompleteController, with the handleAutocomplete method. Well, it's precisely this method that makes sure that the proper data gets collected and properly formatted once served. But let's delve deeper into details and see how precisely we can generate the specific JSON response for our text field element. For this, we'll need to:   set up a AutoCompleteController class file under “my_module>src>Controller > AutocompleteController.php"   then, extend the ControllerBase class and set up our handle method (the one “responsible” for displaying the proper results)   it's the Request object and those arguments already defined in your routing.yml.file (“name” for the field name and “5” for the count, remember?) that will pass for your handler's parameters   the Request object will be the one returning the typed string from URL, whereas the “field_name” and the “count” route parameters will be the ones providing the results array.   Note: once you get to this step here, as you add autocomplete to text fields in Drupal 8, remember that you should be having data in “value” and “label” key-value, as well: Next, you'll set up a new JsonResponse object and pass $results, thus generating a return JsonResponse.   Summing Up That's pretty much all the “hocus pocus” that you need to do to add autocomplete to text fields in Drupal 8. Now the proper data results should be generated. Just reload your app's form page and run a quick test: Try to create a brand new channel in your app and to add some of the already existing team members. Does the text field have autocomplete functionality added to? ... Read more
RADU SIMILEANU / Jul 18'2018
Set Up a Local Drupal Site with Lando in no Time: Get Started with Docker
Let's say that you need to spin up a new Drupal environment in... minutes. To quickly test a new patch to Drupal core, maybe, or to switch between 2 or more clients on the same day and thus to run multiple copies on several websites... In this case, how about taking the quick and easy way and set up a local Drupal site with Lando? "What is Lando?" you might legitimately ask yourself. A DevOps tool and Docker container-based technology enabling you to spin up all the services and tools that you need to develop a new Drupal project in no time. "Why would I choose Lando as a method to set up a local Drupal site?" Let me list here some of the strongest reasons:   it makes setting up a local Drupal site unexpectedly easy (and I'm talking about "minutes" here) it makes getting started with Docker container technology a whole lot easier it enables you to share your Drupal site's configuration within your team right on your Git repository (taking the form of a YAML file) it puts several development environments (LEMP, MEAN, LAMP) at your disposal   Are these reasons strong enough for you? If so, here's a quick step-by-step guide on how precisely to set up a Drupal site with Lando:   Step 1: First, Make Sure You Meet the System Requirements If, as a web developer, you're not efficient with using the command line... well... then there are high chances that you find this tutorial here a bit discouraging. And if being more than just familiar with the command line is not a strict requirement, then the following system requirements () are:   macOS 10.10+ Linux (with kernel version 4.x or higher) Windows 10 Pro+ (or equivalent) with Hyper-V running   These are the 3 operating systems that Lando's currently compatible with. Now, let's move on...   Step 2: Download and Install Lando and Docker  Go to Lando releases on Github and download the latest version for your OS. Just run the installer and let it "do the job" for you:   install Docker for Windows, Docker for Mac, Docker CE install Lando: for Mac run brew cask install Lando and for other OS download the .rpm, .dmg, .exe or .deb   Step 3: Create a New Drupal Project Luckily for you, there are several ways to get a Drupal codebase. Pick the one that you're most comfortable with as you set up a local Drupal site with Lando:   install Drupal 8 the standard way (the first step there being "Get the Code"); next, grab the latest version of Drupal 8 navigating to "Download & Extend" or use Composer to create your new Drupal project: composer create-project drupal-composer/drupal-project:8.x-dev my_drupal_project --stability dev --no-interaction or just navigate somewhere on your PC and use GIT to clone it: git clone --branch 8.6.x https://goo.gl/Q3MoVu lando-d8   Step 4: Set Up a Local Drupal Site with Lando: Extract Drupal To extract Drupal just: open up your terminal window enter the commands here below: cd Sites tar xzf /tmp/drupal-8.5.1.tar.gz mv drupal-8.5.1 drupal-lando cd drupal-lando And thus set up the Sites/drupal-lando/ directory inside your home directory Step 5: Set Up Lando    Now's time to initialize Lando and enable it to create a basic configuration file for you. And, again, you have more than just one option at hand:   while still in your terminal window, run the following command and specify the Drupal 8 recipe and your web root as web, next name it "drupal-lando": lando init --recipe drupal8 --webroot=. --name="drupal-lando" or just launch the interactive session: run "lando init" interactively   Next, it's the following YAML file/ ".lando.yml", that it will create: name: drupal-lando recipe: drupal8 config: webroot: . Note: feel free to ignore the "lando init" step and to jump straight to copying and pasting this file here.   Step 6: Start Your Environment & Wait for Your Docker Containers to Get Set Up And here you are now, at that step from the whole process where you set up a local Drupal site with Lando where you start your Docker engine. For this, just run the following command in your terminal window: lando start  If everything goes according to plan, this is where Lando starts Docker and sets up 2 containers. Next, feel free to run: lando composter install It's going to use PHP/Composer inside the newly created Docker container for building Drupal's Composer dependencies.   Step 7: Browse to Your Site's URL and Walk Through the Drupal Installation Process Time to install your new clean Drupal 8 site now. Just visit your local site in the web browser and walk through the Drupal wizard install process (since your new site starts with an empty database, you will be automatically directed to the Install page) Once you reach the step where you need to configure your database, enter these options here:   Database host: database Database name, username, password: drupal8   Next, unfold the "Advanced Options" drop-down menu and:   replace "localhost", currently showing up in the "Host" field, with "database" hit the "Save and Continue" button and let the Drupal installation process carry out   You'll set up a local Drupal site with Lando in... minutes! A brand new website that you can then easily:   test debug manage with Composer   Optionally, you can add a new service of your liking (e.g. MailHog, for catching outbound mails) and custom tune your setup right from your .lando.yml.file. The END! And this is how you do it... Told you it was just a matter of a few easy steps!  ... Read more
RADU SIMILEANU / Jul 10'2018
These Are the 15 Best Drupal Security Modules Worth Installing on Your Website
I'm a woman of my word, as you can see: here I am now, as promised in my previous post on the most effective ways to secure a Drupal website, ready to run a “magnifying glass” over the best Drupal security modules. To pinpoint their main characteristics and most powerful features and thus to reveal why they've made it to this list. And why you should put them at the top of your own Drupal security checklist. So, shall we dig in?   1.  Login Security   It's only but predictable that since the login page/form is the entry to your Drupal site, it is also the most vulnerable page there, as well. Therefore, secure it! In this respect, what this module enables site admins to do is : define a certain number of login attempts; too many invalid authentication attempts will automatically block that account block/limit access for specific IPs   Moreover, you get notified by email or via Nagios notifications when someone is just username/password guessing or using other kinds of brute force techniques to log into your Drupal site. In short: the Login Security module, through its variety of options that it “spoils” you with, empowers you to set up a custom login policy on your site. To define your own restrictions and exceptions. 2. Drupal Core Update Module     As already mentioned here, on this blog, when we've tackled the topic of Drupal security: Keeping your Drupal core updated is that easily underrated, yet most powerful security measure that you could implement! Now what this module here does is assisting you in keeping your Drupal codebase up to date: safely patched and having all the crucial upgrades. And I don't need to remind you the security risk(s) that all those site owners ignoring the latest patches to Drupal core expose their websites to, right?    3. Captcha   Captcha is one of the best Drupal security modules since it's one of the most used ones. And no wonder: could you imagine submission forms on your website with no Captcha? The age-old system is one of the handiest ways to keep spammers and spambots away. So, having this module “plugged in”, providing you with the needed captcha support, becomes wisely convenient.   4. Password Policy   The module enables you, as your Drupal site's admin, to define specific rules for “wannabe users” to follow when they set up their account passwords. From constraints related to:   special symbols that those passwords should include, to ramp up both the given account's and your own site's security to uppercase letters to numbers...   … once you plug in this Drupal security module in, it's you who gets to set up the policy for creating account passwords.   5. Security Review, One of the Best Drupal Security Modules The Security Review module is that “Swiss knife” that you need for hardening your site's shield. Meaning that it's an all-in-one tool. One that comes with its own Drupal security checklist that it regularly goes through and sets against your website, detecting any missing or improperly implemented security measures. Moreover, it automates a whole series of tests for tracking down any signs of exploits and brute-force attacks:   arbitrary PHP execution XSS exploits SQL injection suspicious PHP or JavaScript activity in content nodes   Once it identifies the vulnerabilities, it “alerts” you and gives you the best recommendations for mitigating those security risks. All you need to do is follow the suggestions.   6. Security Kit Another module that “empowers” you to take full control over the security strategy on your Drupal site. To set up specific options for minimizing the chances of exploitable “cracks” showing up in its security shield: For instance, it could recommend you to set up HTTP headers on your Drupal site.   7. Session Limit     Here's another one of those best Drupal security modules that's also one of the widely used ones. Why is it a must-have on your own Drupal site? Because it enables you to set a limit to the number of simultaneous sessions per user, per role. This way, you trim down the chances of suspicious activity being carried out on your site and eventually leading to brute-force attacks.   8. Automated Logout       Another module that's a must on your Drupal site: It basically enables you, the site admin, to define a policy that would log out users after a specified time period of inactivity.    9. Two Factor Authentication     LinkedIn, Google, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook are just some of the big names that have adopted this user authentication method for security reasons. So, why shouldn't you, too? Especially when you have a dedicated module at hand, Two Factor Authentication, to:   provide you with various methods to select from: pre-generated codes, time-based one-time PINS or passwords, codes sent via SMS etc. give you full freedom in defining that two-factor authentication strategy that suits your site best   The principle is as simple for the user, as it is effective for your website, from a security standpoint: The user gets a security code that he/she'll then need to use for logging into your Drupal site.   10. Coder   A command-line tool, with IDE support, that gives your codebase a deep scan and detects any drift from the coding standards and best practices. Why has it made it to this exclusive list of 15 best Drupal security modules? Cause vulnerabilities might be lurking right in your Drupal code, not necessarily in your users' weak passwords or unpatched core modules. Having a tool at hand that would identify and notify you of all those weak links in your code, where the best practices aren't being followed, is just... convenience at its best.   11. SpamSpan     Another key module to add to your Drupal security checklist.  For you do agree that email addresses are some of hackers' easiest ways to infiltrate into your website, don't you?  Now what this module here does is obfuscate email addresses so that spambots can't collect them. Note: a key strength of SpamSpan is that it uses JavaScript for this process, which enhances accessibility.   12. ACL       “A set of APIs” This is how we could define this module here, which doesn't come with its own UI. Its key role? To enable other Drupal modules on your website to set up a list of users that would get selective access to specific nodes on your site.   13. Paranoia       Why is Paranoia one of the best Drupal security modules? Because it will end your “paranoia” — as its name suggests — that an ill-intentioned user might evaluate arbitrary code on your site. The module practically identifies all those vulnerable areas where a potential attacker could exploit your site's code and blocks them.   14. Content Access         Limiting or blocking access to key content types on your site is no more than a common-sense security measure to take, don't you agree? Therefore, this module here's designed to assist you throughout this process:   as you define detailed permissions on your site: to view/edit/ delete specific content types … by user role and by author    Word of caution: do keep in mind that, since Content Access uses Drupal's node API, you shouldn't enable other modules using the same endpoints on your website!   15. Google Apps Authentication         A module that ramps up not just your site's security, but also its accessibility. Just think about it: Nowadays anyone has at least one Google account. Therefore, “anyone” can easily log into your website using his/her own Google account credentials. Once, of course, you will have installed and turned this Drupal module on. END of list! These are the 15 best Drupal security modules worth installing on your site.  Scan them through, weigh their key features, set them against your site's specific security needs and make your selection! ... Read more
Adriana Cacoveanu / Jul 04'2018
OPTASY Is a Gold-Level Sponsor of Drupal North Regional Summit 2018: Moving Drupal Forward!
Save the date(s): 10-12 August! And join us for a 3-day conference on building with Drupal, driving this open-source technology forward and strengthening & growing the community behind it: Drupal North Regional Summit 2018.  You'll find us in our booth at the Toronto Reference Library's exhibit hall, to be more specific, since this year OPTASY's a proud gold sponsor of the fourth edition of this event:  The biggest annual summit in Canada focused on promoting Drupal.    Why Would You Attend Drupal North Regional Summit 2018? That's right: why would you pack your bags and get en route for Toronto's Reference Library when summer is at its peak and everyone's looking for a place in the sun? For a bunch of strong reasons, actually:   first of all, if you're already living in Canada, why would you want to miss the biggest annual event in North America promoting Drupal? no less than 300+ individuals and organizations will be attending it if you're a Drupal developer, this is a once-in-a-year opportunity to grow and to... outgrow yourself; the event's schedule is “overcrowded” with sessions covering a variety of Drupal-related topics, with “can't miss” keynote sessions and networking opportunities … grow your profile by sharing your knowledge and expertise all while enriching it as you learn from other Drupalists attending the event as a Drupal-powered organization, Drupal North Regional Summit 2018 is a great chance to recruit new talent (and this is the event's key “mandate”: to showcase Canadian Drupal talent), to make connections with other Drupal-fueled businesses...   Whether you're:   in the government, nonprofit, education, business field a freelancing Drupal enthusiast looking to keep his/her knowledge up to date … don't miss the largest summit in Canada promoting Drupal!   It'll be a win-win-win type of situation:   you (the Drupal developer) get to keep your knowledge up to date you (the organization) get to dig through a pool of Drupal talent and also to network with other key decision-makers from some of the most notorious companies in Canada running their businesses on Drupal and it's a winning situation for Drupal itself: all the individuals and companies attending the summit will help to extend its reach to more people and more businesses    OPTASY Proudly Supports Drupal and the Drupal North Regional Summit 2018 Why? What's in it for us? Why are we so proud to be one of the gold sponsors of this Drupal summit in Canada? Because we like to practice what we preach: To give back to the (Drupal) community, what the community gave to us for free. And along these +15 years years since we've been developing in Drupal there's been plenty of work done by all those developers contributing to Drupal and moving this open-source technology forward that we leveraged in our own projects. It's only but common sense to give something back now and to contribute ourselves, too. And sponsoring Drupal events is one way that we can do that. But there are other reasons, too, why we decided to support the Drupal North Regional Summit 2018 as a gold sponsor. All of them deriving from the above-presented reasoning:   the 3-day conference makes the perfect “lab” where brilliant solutions to well-known issues in Drupal get identified and shared with the community, new Drupal modules get put into the spotlight, new ways of innovating this technology get presented in other words: investing in this Drupal summit we invest in us, as a team and as a company, and implicitly in our own clients, as well ... all the knowledge and “steamy-fresh information” that we get from this conference will then be put to use when working on our clients' future projects it's also a great place to network with existing and potentially new Drupal-using companies and an opportunity for us to “expose” the key advantages that set OPTASY apart as a Drupal agency: +15 years hands-on experience, proven Drupal expertise, pure passion for what we do, a strong work ethic and stellar communication skills confirmed by our clients   So, are you curious about Drupal's main strengths as a technology of the future? Interested to discover what precisely helps it stand out? Are you looking for a Drupal partner with both the proven experience and the proper “weakness” for innovation to turn your ideas into digital reality? Stop by our booth then, in August, and let's talk Drupal, growth opportunities and everything in between! ... Read more
Adriana Cacoveanu / Jul 02'2018
What Are Some Quick and Easy Ways to Secure Drupal? 7-Step Security Checklist
You have patched your Drupal website, haven't you? If so, then that critical 3-month-old security flaw, Drupalgeddon2, can't get exploited on your site. Even so, with the menace of a cryptocurrency mining attack still lurking around the unpatched websites, you legitimately ask yourself: what are some quick and easy ways to secure Drupal? “Which are the most basic steps to take and the simplest best practices to adopt to harden my Drupal site's security myself?” Now, using keywords such as “security measures”, “quick”, “easy” and “handy”, I've come up with a list of 7 basic steps that any Drupal site owner can (and should) take for locking down his/her website. Here they are, in no particular order:   1. Keep Your Drupal Core and Modules Updated  Not only is this one of the simplest ways to secure Drupal, but one of the most effective ones, as well. Even so more now, with the Drupalgeddon2 Drupal security threat still fresh in our memory, ignoring the regularly released security updates for both Drupal core and its modules is just plain recklessness or... self-sabotage. Keep your Drupal version updated: apply security patches as soon as they get released, avoiding to leave your site exposed and exploitable. As simple as that! And where do you add that this is one of those Drupal security best practices that's the easiest to integrate into your routine. Since to run the latest updates you only need to:   sign in to your Admin panel go to “Manage”  scroll down to “Reports” → “Available Reports” click on “Check manually” if there are any critical security updates that you're advised to run, just click “Update”   This is all it takes for you to: seal any security loopholes in your Drupal core prevent any identified vulnerability from growing into a conveniently easy to access backdoor for hackers to get in   2. Install Drupal Security Modules  Strengthening the shield around your Drupal site with some powerful Drupal security modules is another both handy and effective measure that you, yourself, can easily implement. Luckily, you're definitely not out of options when it comes to good security modules in Drupal. And I'm only going to run a short module inventory here, since I'm already preparing a blog post focused precisely on this topic. Therefore, I promise to delve deep into details about each one of the here-listed modules in my next post:   Secure Login   The Security Review (Drupal 7 only)     Paranoia    Captcha     Two-factor Authentication    Content Access         Security Kit     Password Policy       Automated Logout     Password Strength     Downloading, installing security modules on your Drupal site is both:   quick and simple to do highly effective    And they serve a wide range of purposes, from:   enforcing strong password policies to monitoring DNS changes to locking down your site from security threats to blocking malicious networks to turning on a firewall on your site   As for their selection, it depends greatly on your list of priorities when it comes to improving your site's security. Take some time to weigh and to compare their features.   3. Remove Unused Modules: One of the Easiest Ways to Secure Drupal  Being the “easiest” security measure to implement doesn't make it also “the most popular” among Drupal site owners. Owners who more often than not:   underrate the importance of running a regular module usage audit on their sites ignore the Drupal security threat that an outdated piece of code (or an unused module) could turn itself into, once exploited by an attacker   So, don't be one of those site owners! Are there modules on your site that you no longer use?  That have grown outdated and that are just... lingering there, using your site's resources and risking to grow into an exploitable backdoor for hackers? Identify them and remove them! It won't take more than just a few priceless minutes of your time.   4. Enforce a Strong Password Policy Since it's not just the admin (you do have a smart username and password for logging into your admin dashboard, don't you?) that will log into your Drupal site, but users, too, implementing some strong user-side security measures is a must. In this respect, creating a strong password policy — one that would enforce the creation of complex, “hard-nut-to-crack” type of login credentials — is one the best and the easiest ways to secure Drupal on the user's side. Come up with a policy that defines specific requirements for setting up passwords of high enough entropy (letters, uppercase/lowercase, symbols, different characters combos). And don't hesitate to rely on dedicated Drupal modules for enforcing those requirements defined in your policy:   Password Strength   Secure Login    5. Block Access to All Your Sensitive Files I bet you don't want important folders, core files — upgrade.php., install.php, authorize.php, cron.php —  to be easily accessible to just... anyone, right? So, how about limiting or blocking access to them? And you can easily do that by configuring your .htaccess file —  it's the one containing details of crucial importance regarding your website access and credentials to specific parts and core files on your site: Just specify the IP addresses allowed to access those core folders, files and subdomains. Here's one “enlightening” example: <FilesMatch "(authorize|cron|install|upgrade)\.php"> Order deny, allow deny from all Allow from 127.0.0.1 </FilesMatch> Note! Now speaking of limiting access, don't limit your restrictions to your core folders and files. Remember to restrict/block access to your web server, to your server login details, as well. How? By adding a basic layer of authentication limiting server access and file access usage. Also, do remember to cautiously manage access to certain port numbers that your site/app might be using.   6. Back Up, Back Up, then... Back Up Some More  You can't anticipate brute-force attacks, but you sure can “land back on your feet” if the worst scenario ever happens. And you can only do that if you have a clean and recent backup at hand to just rollback and restore your website. In other words: back up regularly!  And remember to always back up your files and MySQL database before any update that you run on your Drupal code and modules. It is one of those common sense Drupal security best practices that should be included in any basic security checklist! Where do you add that you even have a dedicated Drupal module —  Backup and Migrate — to assist you with this process. Some of the back up “burdens” that this module will take off your shoulders are:   backing up/restoring code and multiple MySQL databases integrating Drush  backing up files directory setting up several backup schedules AES encryption for backups 7. Review All User Roles and Grant the Minimum Permissions Necessary How many user roles are there assigned on your Drupal site? If you don't quite know the answer, then it's obvious: You must give your entire user role system an audit! And to stick to this habit, one of the simplest ways to secure Drupal, after all. Review all the user roles and, most of all, review each one's set of permissions and make sure you trim them down to the minimum necessary for each role.  This way, you'll also limit access to critical files for those users that shouldn't have the permission to download or visualize them. And speaking of permission, do keep in mind to review all your file permissions, as well! See which user roles are granted permission to access key directories or to read, write or modify certain files on your website and block/restrict access where necessary. The END! Of course, this isn't even close to a complete list of ways to secure Drupal. If it had been an exhaustive one, it would have continued with more Drupal security best practices, such as:   getting the SSL Certificate securing HTTP headers using secure connections only   Etc. etc. I've only focused on some of the easiest and quickest measures that anyone, with little, close to no technical know-how at all, can implement. And I feel like stressing out the term “practice” here: Securing your Drupal site is a constant process; a series of persistent efforts and not a one time thing. Remain vigillant and cautious and don't rely on just a one-time, multifaceted security hardening “marathon”.   ... Read more
Adriana Cacoveanu / Jun 28'2018
My Drupal Site Has Been Hacked: What Do I Do? How Do I Restore It? 10 Steps to Clean It Up
Oops! The worst has happened: your Drupal site has been hacked! Maybe it was precisely one of those critical vulnerabilities, that the Drupal security team has been drawing attention to these last months, that the attacker(s) exploited?  Now what? What to do? Should you be:   rushing to restore your website to a healthy, good-working state (that, of course, if you do have a clean and recent backup available)? starting to rebuild it? investigating how your Drupal site got contaminated in the first place: where's the “open door” that the attackers used to get in? focusing on closing any backdoors that could make new attacks possible?   Now “tormenting” yourself with too many questions simultaneously will only distract you from what should be your main objective: cleaning up your website (and preventing further hacks I should add). So, let's go about it methodically, step by step:   Step 1: Write Down Issues, Steps to Take, Preventive Measures to Apply Keep your cool and go for a methodical approach to crisis management: Just open up a document and start... documenting:   the issues and any suspicious activity that you identify on your site all the steps that your strategy for removing malware and restoring your site should include the preventive security measures you commit to taking for preventing such a scenario from happening again the future   Step 2: Make a Forensic Copy of Your Drupal Site  Before you start running your “investigations” on the attack, on how your Drupal site has been hacked, and way before you get to rebuild anything: Make a forensic copy of all your files, you database and your operating system environment! Note: go with an external storage medium for these copies and store them offsite. As you're scanning through your files, detecting viruses and malware and having them cleaned up, feel free to make new and new “working backups”. And to store them in a different directory (from your regular backup files, I mean). “But why bother? When will these backups turn out particularly useful?”   when you call out to a third party to assist you with the troubleshooting process; these “working” backups will then provide a clear picture of the site before you started “malware detecting” on your own when you try to fix the issues you detect, but instead you make them worse; then, you can easily roll back those changes    Step 3: Scan Your Servers and PC for Malware, Malicious Code Injections, Viruses Before you rush to change all the passwords on your site, pause for a moment to think through your next “move”: What if the attack has been “programmed” so that the attacker should get notified once you change your password(s)? And what if it's precisely your PC or one of your servers that's got infected? Then storing a clean backup of your site precisely there would only make it even more vulnerable. So, how do you prevent that? You give both your PC and your servers a deep scan before making any change. And, thank God, you sure aren't nickel and dimed in anti-malware tools and anti-virus software: AVG, BitDefender, Malwarebytes, ESET, AV-Comparatives etc.   Step 4: Detect & Remove the Backdoors One of the crucial steps to take, once you realize that your Drupal site has been hacked, is to “close” all the backdoors. These could easily turn into hackers' access ticket into your site even after you've removed malware and restored it to its healthy state. But, for closing them you first need to... find them right? So, where to look? Here are a few key places on your site that you should focus your “searches” on:   access logs: while scanning them, be vigilant and look for PHP scrips and POST requests added to directories that have writable access   eCommerce set up: check all the payment methods, shipping addresses, credit card addresses, linked accounts, looking for any suspicious, newly added data   passwords: FTP passwords, admin passwords, control panel passwords   email rules and filters: check that the answers to the security questions are “legitimate”, that messages are being forwarded to correct email addresses etc.   Step 5: Consider Taking Your Site Offline And your decision depends greatly on the nature of your site: If it's a hacked eCommerce Drupal site that we're talking about here, then don't wait even one more minute: take your site down (along with the internal network and servers) and install a placeholder! This way, you'll prevent:   malware from being further distributed spam from being sent to your online store's customers   Note: do keep in mind that taking your site offline will instantly let the attackers know that you've detected the malware that they've “infiltrated” and that you are about to “take action”. If you decide not to take your Drupal site offline at the web server level, ensure that you've got your clean forensic copy at hand before deleting all the sessions. Note: have you detected suspicious changes of the passwords? If so, use this query here for updating them (Drupal 7):   update users set pass = concat('ZZZ', sha(concat(pass, md5(rand())))) As for the users, they can easily use the reset password tool for updating their passwords. Word of caution: mind you don't take "Drupal on maintenance mode” for “offline Drupal". They're 2 completely different things! Once your Drupal site has been hacked, the malware could be of such nature that it allows the attacker to infiltrate as long as the site's online.   Step 6: Notify Your Hosting Provider That Your Drupal Site Has Been Hacked  They should be informed about the breach and about your site being taken offline (if it's the case) immediately. The sooner the better, this way they can:   start scanning their own systems for incursions get ready to assist you with your site recovery and securing process   Step 7: Handle Client Data with Extra Precaution  And these are the specific scenarios where you'll need to take extra precautions when handling client information:   your Drupal site stores client information on the web host … it leverages the data POST method for sending form data via e-mail … it doesn't integrate with a 3rd party payment gateway, but manages the payment processes itself   If one of these 3 scenarios suits your case, then here are some of these extra precautions that you need to make to ensure the private user data doesn't get exposed:   update your SSL certificate re-check all logfiles (have any of the hosted client information been copied, updated or downloaded?) implement AVS (address verification system)  add CVV (card verification value) encrypt connections to back-end services used for sending confidential user data    Step 8: Investigate the Attack: Identify the Source(s) of Infection No matter how much pressure you might find yourself under to get your site back online ASAP, don't let take control over your site's restoring process! Not until you've detected the main source of contamination on your site. The key vulnerability that attackers exploited, the key reason why your Drupal site has been hacked in the first place. That being said, make sure that:   you first audit, on a staging server, that “clean” backup of your site that you're planning to get online; this way, you track down and remove infected files, unauthorized settings, malicious code  you compare pre- and post-hack files, looking for any suspicious changes   Now if you have a clean (and recent) backup at hand for running this comparison, the problem's almost solved. Just use the right tools to compare your files and track down discrepancies. But if you don't have a backup at hand, then there's no other way but to: Manually inspect your files and databases to identify any suspicious changes that have been made. look for any suspicious iframe or JavaScript at the end of the files (if detected, save the code in an external file) look for any sources of “Drupal site hacked redirect”; for links to external URLs   Now, as for the places that you should be running your investigations on, let me give you just a few clues:   .php files, .html files  sessions table  newly modified/created files new/updated user accounts  in writable directories and database    Step 9: Do a Full Restore of Your Site  So, you've noticed that your Drupal site has been hacked, you've assessed all the damage caused, removed malware and even detected the vulnerability that hackers exploited to get in, not it's only but logical to: Try to repair your website, right? Word of caution: never ever run your changes on your production site; instead, fix all detected issues on a staging site. Also, once you've cleaned it all up, remember to run the latest Drupal security updates, as well! Now, getting back to repairing your site, you have 2 options at hand:   you either restore a clean backup, if you know the date and time that your Drupal site has been hacked and you're also 100% sure that none of the system components, other than Drupal, got contaminated or you rebuild your Drupal site    The latter method is, undoubtedly more cumbersome, yet a lot more cautious. Go for it if:   you do not know the precise date and time when your site's got contaminated you do not have a clean (and recent) backup available to restore you've evaluated the damages as being already too widespread     Step 10: Give Your Restored Site a Full Check Before Going Live  Do remember to give your newly recovered site a final audit before getting it back up:   remove all malicious code detected suspicious files unauthorized settings   And, most of all: Close all the backdoors!   Final Word  A pretty long, complex and discouragingly tedious recovery process, don't you think?  So, why wouldn't you avoid all these steps that you need to go through once your Drupal site has been hacked? Why not avoid the risk of finding yourself forced to take your website offsite for... God knows how long, risking to impact your site's reputation and to drive away users/online customers? Don't you find it wiser to:   be prepared instead? opt for ongoing Drupal maintenance and support services? make a habit of regularly backing up your website? keep your system and software up to date (and to install all the recommended patches)? stop underrating the security advisories that the Drupal team makes?   ... Read more
RADU SIMILEANU / Jun 25'2018