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Bootstrap 4 news
Bootstrap is a giant framework with almost everything you could need for building a site or web app interface. Bootstrap is changing, version four is in alpha release. Naturally, we’re just as curious to know what’s different, so I dived into the documentation to find out. Keep in mind, though, that this is an alpha release. It cannot be considered feature-complete. It could radically change. From Less to Sass This is obviously the biggest and most important change. Heck, you’ve probably already heard of it. People have gone so far as to procliam the “death of Less” due to this switchover. Well, I don’t know if anything’s gone and died because the Bootstrap team decided to do things differently. It is, however, a monumental undertaking, and it will drastically change how people use and customize the framework. Sass is just generally more developer-friendly, with wider support, a bigger community, and yes, more features. It can do some things that, right now, Less just can’t. I say this with sadness. I’ve never made any secret of my love for Less; but it seems that the community at large has spoken, and declared that Sass is just, well, better. New features   Figures   Figures are for showcasing single media objects (usually images), with an optional caption. Support for Bootstrap’s various helper classes is factored in, so you can align and style the image (and its caption) however you like. Images placed in a figure element, given the right classes, become responsive automatically. Flexbox Now, due to lack of support, Flexbox has not replaced the regular grid system. However, it is available to anyone who wants it. Change a variable, recompile the Sass, and boom! You now have a new, modern layout system. Cards Okay, we’ve been seeing the proliferation of card-based design for some time now. Bootstrap now has a specific component for them, with myriad layout options. You can group them up, keep them separate, add headers, footers, buttons, images, and overlay text on those images. Wells, thumbnails, and panels all get replaced by the new card component, so in that way, Bootstrap is a bit more streamlined. Reboot: new customization variables Bootstrap has historically been a bit of a pain to customize, aesthetically speaking: There were a lot of styles to over-write, and individual variables to customize if you wanted to make your Bootstrap-based site look like anything other than a Bootstrap-based site. Heck, remember all of those customization apps made just for changing Boostrap’s look? Well the developers have heard your prayers and Github issues. Change all of the transition animations at once, disable rounded corners, change all the colors, or anything else you like with one big bunch of Sass variables. It’s all there in the Reboot module, and it’s about time. We can expect some more original-looking designs now, with any luck. Rem and em units That’s right, we’re moving away from pixels, to these relational units of measurement. This ties into the whole customization thing, too. Want a tighter design with thinner margins? Change the main text size, maybe a couple of variables, and boom. Everything looks “thinner”. Stuff that’s basically the same As you might expect, everything got re-written and upgraded (because of the Sass move). But still, the basic usage for most of these components will be the same. Do double-check the documentation, though. Certain things will have changed. Take the grid, for example: they added an “extra-large” tier to the grid system, presumably for those ridiculously huge retina screens that we’re seeing these days. · Alerts · Breadcrumb · Button dropdown · Button group · Buttons · Card · Carousel · Code · Collapse · Dropdowns · Forms · Images · Input group · Jumbotron · Label · List group · Modal · Navbar · Navs · Pagination · Popovers · Progress · Reboot · Scrollspy · Tables · The Grid · Tooltips · Typography Other updates   No more IE8 support   It’s about time. There’s not a whole lot more to say about that. Not much will change for most of us. Anybody who really, really needs to support legacy browsers will have to use an older version of Bootstrap. All JavaScript plugins have been re-written The proliferation of ES6 means that a lot of people are re-writing their JavaScript. This means performance improvements for all, the exodus of older browsers, and programmers having fun with new toys. It’s a win-win. Overall impressions Where Foundation is going “smaller” and more streamlined with specialized frameworks, Bootstrap seems to want it all. They have done a lot of work to improve performance, and streamline what they could, but Bootstrap still aims to do just about everything you can think of. Mind you, anyone can configure their version of the framework however they like by dropping unnecessary modules, or adding new ones. It’s not a big deal. Still, there’s definitely a one-size-fits-all mindset in play. And that can be a good thing. There are large, wide-scope projects out there that need the room to expand. In any case, Bootstrap will continue to satisfy its users’ needs. It’s going to be mostly the same, but better. Source: http://www.developerdrive.com ... Read more
Adrian Ababei / May 11'2016
Color Guide
I’m not a fan of color theory. But the theory has always eluded me, and, truthfully, I’ve never found it useful when trying to use color in my projects. Somewhat ironically, I’ve been finding that the better I get at choosing and using color, the better I become in the theory behind it. Of course, that doesn’t really help when you’re just starting out, does it? That’s why, in this article, you won’t see a single color wheel. Instead I’m going to show you a simple color workflow that you can use in your next web project. You will, of course, subconsciously be learning the theory along the way. So, I recommend coming back in a few months time and giving the theory another go. Choosing A Base Color We can see something like 10 million colors at any given time, that’s a huge amount of colors. And out of those, we need to choose one — just one color — to be the base of our website, for our brand. Everything will stem from this one color, so it’s kind of important. How to choose a starting color Now, picking a color out of the blue (pun intentional) would be quite easy, but we’re not going to do that. For any project in which you’re having contact with clients, you should try to justify as many of your choices as you can. If you don’t, it’ll be a case of your favorite color versus their favorite color. They’re the client. They’re paying you. They will win. Don’t think too much about it. Just make sure you have some kind of reasoning behind your color choice (and every choice, for that matter). It’ll make you look good. Tips on choosing a starting color • Use what you have. If the client has a logo with an established color, that will usually be your starting color. • Eliminate your competitors’ colors. If one of your main competitors has a strong brand color, don’t copy it if you can help it. Find your competitors’ colors to eliminate them from your own color schemes. • Think about your target audience. The colors of a website for a pizza shop would sure be very different from the colors for a kids club. Think about who will be using the website and how you want them to feel (excited, serious, taken care of, etc.). • But don’t default to stereotypes. If you’re designing a website for young girls, you don’t have to use pink. Avoid clichés to gain credibility. • Play a word game. If you’re struggling, write down any words that you associate with the client’s business. This list should give you some ideas for colors. If you’re really struggling, hop on any website about color meanings and see which fits best. You should now have a base color in mind for the design. It should be something simple like red, green, blue, yellow or pink. We’ll get to the exact shade next. Let’s say you choose blue. Choosing A (Nice) Base Color Instead of messing about with Photoshop’s color-picker to find a nice shade of blue, we’re going to steal like an artist and use other people’s design choices to help us out. First, go to Dribbble.com and Designspiration.com and click on the “Colors” link in both. You can use this as the next step to find the right shade of blue. For a fresh and energetic brand, go for one of the lighter, brighter blues (one of the top five options). For something a bit more corporate and serious, the bottom five should be a better fit. Choose a shade from each website to see actual designs that use that color. You can then use any of CSS-Tricks’ color-picking techniques to grab the exact colors right in the browser. Not only will you see different versions of your base color, but you will easily see colors that match. Creating A Strong Color Palette All right, you should now have a HEX value for your color. Now we’re going to make a palette out of that color. And it’s easier than you think. The problem with this kind of color palette is that applying it to a real design isn’t very practical. Most palettes have way more colors than you’d ever need, especially considering that we need to add an average of three neutral colors to every scheme: • white, • dark gray, • light gray (optional). If you tried to add five or six colors to the neutrals, it would be a mess. All you really need are two colors: • a base color, • an accent color (we’ll get to this in a jiffy). If you can create a website using only these five colors, you’ll get a much better result than if you were to go overboard with complementaries, split-complementaries, triads and the rest. Finding your accent Your accent color will be used in very small amounts on your website, usually as a call to action. So, it needs to stand out. Your next step is to go to Paletton.com and type your HEX code into the color box. From here, you can find your accent in two ways. First, you could click the “Add Complementary”! That yellow there? That’s your accent. Alternatively, if you don’t like the color it has generated, you can click around the icons at the top to find something more suitable. Personally, I quite like the red that comes up under the triad icon, so I’m going to use that for our scheme. There is, of course, science and stuff behind what Paletton is doing; but, for now, let’s put a pin on it. You’ll learn the theory a bit later, and all will become clear. So, below is our color scheme as it is now. We’ve got a nice base color and a shot of an accent. Let’s add white to the mix, because white is always good. All that’s missing now are some grays. Adding the gray For most of my web projects, I find having two shades of gray to be infinitely useful — one dark, one light. You’ll use them a lot. The dark is usually used for text, and the light for when you need subtle differentiation against all that white (usually for backgrounds). You can choose your grays in one of two ways: • You could use Dribbble.com and Designspiration.com again to find a nice gray from your previous results that matches your base color. But usually it’s easier to type blue website in the search bar, which will show more grays in the results. • If you have Photoshop or the like, you could use Erica Schoonmaker’s technique to harmonize your grays with the base color. Creating harmonious grays To get our shiny new harmonious grays using Erica’s method, we’ll start by picking two default grays out of a hat. Then, follow these steps: 1. Create two shapes and fill them with #4b4b4b and #f5f5f5. 2. Insert a color fill layer above your two shapes. 3. Change that fill to your base color. 4. Set the blending mode to overlay, and bring the opacity right down to between 5 and 40% (in the example below, it’s set at 40%). 5. Use the color picker and copy your new values. I should point out that this method works exceptionally well when your overlay color is blue. For any other color, you will want to either bring the opacity right down to 5 to 10% or stick with your original grays. Our color scheme is complete. Applying Your Color Scheme Now that we’ve got our color scheme, it’s time to apply it. This is a whole other article unto itself. Tip: If you struggle with color, a good trick is to create your website layout in grayscale first. Figure out the hierarchy, and then experiment with the color later. Our accent, red, stands out beautifully against the base color. This is used in very small areas, for buttons and in the icons. The less you use this color, the more it will stand out. The dark gray is used for the text, logo and icon outlines. (Don’t skip putting the colors in your icons. It’s a small detail but makes a big difference.) The white and light gray form the background. The light gray doesn’t have to be here at all, but I find it is another small detail that really makes a website look polished. Conclusion As you can see, we really don’t need much more than the palette we’ve created today. But that doesn’t mean you are limited to these colors! As you’re designing, you might decide it’s appropriate to introduce some more colors to your palette. That’s totally fine! As long as you’re attentive, you can use the steps above to find more colors that work with your scheme. The beauty of this is that the more you do it, the better you’ll become at choosing colors. You’ll get to know what works together and what doesn’t. Sometimes, the method above will yield results that are less than desirable, so feel free to tweak things. Play around and have fun learning color theory, without the theory! Source: https://www.smashingmagazine.com ... Read more
Adrian Ababei / Apr 07'2016
What Are the Essential UI Design Principles that You Should Stick To? Top 7
User interface, also known simply as UI is one of the most important considerations when designing any product. Graphic designers as well as industrial designers use and implement UI design principles but user interface design is becoming more and more important in the digital world.     By following user interface design principles, web developers can make their websites or apps easier and more pleasurable to use. Nowadays the internet is flooded with engaging websites and apps – competition is very high so if you want to make the best out of your user interface and create satisfying user experience.   For user interface design companies and web developers good UI design means starting with basic elements such as fonts and colours, and ultimately to every component present on the web page or in the app. Here is a list of UI design principles which will help you along the way to create attractive and most of all effective UI design for your projects.   Following UI Design Principles The idea behind UI design is simple: it should be centred around the future user. Every UI designer’s number one priority is to understand the intended user and his or her expectations. That being said, it’s a good idea to begin with an analysis of potential users and their expectation. You can begin with either informal or formal research plus a lot of brainstorming. Defining your goals for the user interface itself is paramount to your project’s success in the long run. Here is a list of questions you should take into consideration before beginning to work on the user interface design: What does the user want from it? Is your user comfortable with technology? How does the user engage with the user interface? Once the research part of the task is done, the UI designer can begin building it – afterwards real user testing is needed in order to measure results and make alterations.   UI Design Principles Prioritize Clarity Very clear and specific features are the backbone of creating good UI design. Humans and users tend to ignore things they don’t understand – this allowed us to prioritize on things we consider important instead of wasting time on things we don’t understand. When it comes to user interface design, the principles are the same – most users will simply ignore certain elements such as icons which they don’t immediately understand. Features without a clear purpose are also ignored. UI designers and user interface design companies need to focus on what the user wants or what the user needs from a website. One great example of UI design clarity is Google’s decision to collapse the Gmail menu under a general grid icon. Visually speaking, it looks clean and quite appealing but this small change created many problems for certain users – they couldn’t find the features they needed and some of them didn’t even notice the new icon. When clarity is lost, user experience takes a dive!   UI Design Principles Imply Intuitive Layouts Users need to be able to find the information they need without looking or thinking too hard. Every UI designer needs to create layouts that tells the user how to use the site’s features and how to navigate through it – by doing this you’re creating a better user experience and it also enables users to focus on getting what they need from the web page or app. UI design companies need to consider the real life end users when building websites or apps. Sidebars, menus and other navigation tools should be easy to use and clear. User interface design consistency is also important when building intuitive layouts – all elements and features need to be consistent in terms of use, colour, shape, font, etc. This way, users will be able to use them properly time and time again.   Instant Feedback is Important for UI design Instant-feedback messages can boost your user experience. These messages are essential to keeping your users informed about their actions or what the website is doing – error messages, loading messages or icons, instant updates are essential to providing your users with feedback. Good UI design includes instant feedback for any of the user’s actions.   UI Design Defaults Should be Productive A lot of users don’t even bother to change default features or settings on their interfaces. The iPhone default ringtone is a great example of this – the default setting is neutral. Auto-fill forms can save your users plenty of time by filling in information on their behalf.   Guided Actions Instead of simply leaving users to guess on how they should use a feature why not remove all the guesswork by showing them how to complete certain actions? Good UI design always leads users towards a satisfying and productive experience. Features can be emphasized through size, colour, text or even extra buttons.   UI Design & Basic Design Elements Many user interface designers think basic design elements can’t be innovative or fresh. This is false – good UI design implies using as many basic design elements as possible – these elements have a huge impact on your user experience. Here is a list of basic design elements which you need to keep in perspective: Text size – Text weight has a great impact on shaping your user interface. For example, static text may require your users to zoom in, which can lead to a frustrating user experience. Screen resolution – Good UI design works with varying resolutions. Poor resolution choices can have a negative impact on usability and readability. Distortion – User interface designers need to avoid any disruption or distortion of visuals as it can impede your user from engaging with the user interface properly. Contrast – Contrast makes all elements easy to engage and read. UI design should be accessible for users suffering for colour blindness for example. Keep in mind that low-contrast visuals can cause people with minor vision loss to struggle before finally leaving your website.   Conclusions on UI Design Principles We are all becoming more and more engaged in the online experience so UI design is becoming more important for our daily activities. By following these simple UI design principles, UI designers can make a positive impact on most aspects of our lives. ... Read more
Adrian Ababei / Apr 06'2016
How Do You Make Your Website Responsive? 3 Steps to Implement a Responsive Design
When it comes to mobile development, it’s much easier to create a brand new responsive website than to upgrade an existing website from unresponsive to responsive. That being said, the task is definitely doable if you follow these mobile development tips: This is a list of different mobile development methods which you can use to roll out a responsive redesign.   Responsive retrofit If retrofit works on your current project or website, it’s a great option for quick mobile development. It’s definitely not a magic wand but you can definitely retrofit an existing desktop website to a mobile one in a relatively short period of time – some projects can last under two months while some can last just a few weeks.   Parallel beta You should definitely use a beta and have your users test it out in order to make sure you get the right results. Mobile development companies use this method to get a lot of user feedback and implement different solutions to fix potential problems.   Mobile-only responsive Similar to the parallel beta method, using an existing m-dot site to experiment and gain user feedback is a great idea. The existing m-dot website can be used as a sandbox for rolling out responsive design in stages. This method was used by BBC and the Guardian to upgrade their websites, so you know you’re in good company.   Conclusions With the number of mobile users surpassing desktop users, it’s essential for any organisation or company to have a fully functional responsive website to handle this new trend. ... Read more
Adrian Ababei / Mar 05'2016